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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 84 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 72 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 57 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 49 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 45 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 39 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 38 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 36 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Simon Cameron or search for Simon Cameron in all documents.

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tions with England, consequent on the seizure of Mason and Slidell; whose ultimate surrender he profoundly deprecated, believing that a war waged against us by Great Britain would double our effective military strength, while paralyzing that of the Rebellion, by the spectacle of hostilities waged against us in our extremity by that nation, which very many, alike in the North and in the South, regarded as our hereditary foe. The substitution Jan. 13, 1862. of Mr. Edwin M. Stanton for Gen. Simon Cameron, as head of the War Department, caused some further delay, during which an order was once issued to send Gen. Butler's troops from Fortress Monroe to Port Royal; but it was, on his remonstrance, annulled before it had been acted on. Ship Island is one of quite a number of inconsiderable sand-bars which barely rise above the level of the Gulf between the months of the Mississippi and the Bay of Mobile. It is accounted 7 miles long by three-fourths of a mile in width, though its size
d troops suffered so severely from storm and frost, while so many of his horses were disabled by falling on the icy roads, that his losses probably exceeded the damage inflicted on us; and his blow was fairly countered by Gen. F. W. Lander, who led 4,000 men southward from the Potomac, Feb. 13. and, bridging the Great Cacapon in the night, made a dash at Blooming Gap, which he surprised, killing 13 and capturing 75 Rebels, including 17 officers, with a loss of 2 men and 6 horses. Gen. Simon Cameron had been succeeded Jan. 13. by Hon. Edwin M. Stanton--an eminent lawyer, without pretensions to military knowledge, and of limited experience in public affairs, but evincing a rough energy and zeal for decisive efforts, which the country hailed as of auspicious augury. Two weeks later, Jan. 27. a War Order was issued by the President, commanding a general advance upon the enemy from every quarter on the 22d of February proximo, and declaring that the Secretaries of War and of th
ov. Seward Gen. Butler Gen. Frement Gen. T. W. Sherman Gen. Wool Gen. Dix Gen. Halleck Gen. Cameron his report revised by President Lincoln Seward to McClellan Gen. Burnside Gen. Buell Gentenance. The question of their final disposition will be reserved for future determination. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. To Maj.-Gen. Butler. Time passed. Bull Run had been fought and lost;oration of peaceful relations to the Union, under the Constitution, will immediately remove. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. Gen. T. W. Sherman, Not William T., who became so famous, but an older the Constitution of the country. Mr. Lincoln struck out and suppressed this portion of Gen. Cameron's Report, inserting in its stead the following: It is already a grave question what sl slaveholders every right to which they are entitled under the Constitution of the country. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. The abuse of negroes who had escaped from Rebel masters in Virginia
ndustry to place themselves in a position to go in full and effective pursuit of their fugacious and traitorous proprietors. To the second question, I have tie honor to answer that the instructions given to Brig.-Gen. T. W. Sherman, by the Hon. Simon Cameron, late Secretary of War, and turned over to me by succession for my guidance, do distinctly authorize men to employ all loyal persons offering their services in defense of the Union and for the suppression of this Rebellion, in any manner bereft. To the third interrogatory, it is my painful duty to reply that I never have received any specific authority for issues of clothing, uniforms, arms, equipments, and so forth, to the troops in question — my general instructions from Mr. Cameron to employ them in any manner I might find necessary, and the military exigencies of the Department and the country, being my only, but, in my judgment, sufficient justification. Neither have I had any specific authority for supplying these pe
in their line was formed to the woods this side, losing heavily. It was now 5 P. M. Gen. Franklin had come up, with Gen. Cameron's (3d) division of the 13th corps, and a new and somewhat stronger line was formed; which the exulting foe at once fla and lie was compelled to fight the battle in the best manner possible. Ransom's division had been engaged and routed. Cameron's division was in the thickest of the fight. Gen. Franklin had arrived on the field, and a division of his magnificent The Chicago Tribune's correspondent says: About a half a mile from the field, the 3d division, 13th corps, under Gen. Cameron, came up and formed in line of battle; and here two guns of the Mercantile battery were put in position and opened wit into the Rebels, who were swarming in the road, and then fell back in good order. For full a mile from the place where Cameron's division had met us, the retreat was continued; the Rebels following closely upon our heels, and keeping up a continuo
titution, through the preservation of the nation. Right or wrong, I assumed this ground, and now avow it. I could not feel that, to the best of my ability, I had even tried to preserve the Constitution, if, to save Slavery, or any minor matter, I should permit the wreck of Government, country, and Constitution, altogether. When, early in the war, Gen. Fremont attempted military emancipation, I forbade it, because I did not then think it an indispensable necessity. When, a little later, Gen. Cameron, then Secretary of War, suggested the arming of the Blacks, I objected, because I did not yet think it an indispensable necessity. When, still later, Gen. Hunter attempted military emancipation, I again forbade it, because I did not yet think the indispensable necessity had come. When, in March, and May, and July, 1862, I made earnest and successive appeals to the Border States to favor compensated emancipation, I believed the indispensable necessity for military emancipation and arming
wn at Booneville, 453; captured by Pleasanton's force in Missouri, 561. Caldwell, Brig.-Gen., at Antietam, 208. Camden, Arkansas, Steele marches to, 552. Cameron, Gen. Simon, retires from War Department, 81; 108; in relation to Slaves, 239; 243. Campbell's Station, East Tenn., fight at, 431. Canby, Gen. E. R. S., orgd on, 237; Mr. Lincoln on, 2:37; the West Point conception of, 237; Gens. McDowell and McClellan on, 237-8; Gen. Butler declares slaves contraband of war, 238; Gen. Cameron, Gen. Fremont, and President Lincoln on. 238-40; Gen. T. W. Sherman's assurance, 240; Gen. Wool's contraband order, 240; Gens. Dix and Halleck on. 241; CameronCameron and Lincoln on, 24:1,; Seward on, 243-4; Gen. Burnside's Roanoke Island proclamation, 244; Gens. McCook, Buell, and Doubleday on slave-hunting, 244-6; Gen. Thomas Williams expels all fugitives, 246; Col. Paine of Wisconsin thereon, 246; Lt.-Col. D. R. Anthony thereon, 246; Gen. Hunter's order on, annulled by the President, 246-7;