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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 84 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 72 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 57 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 49 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 45 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 39 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 38 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 36 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Simon Cameron or search for Simon Cameron in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 9 document sections:

ly the troops with equipments and clothing. So that it is a matter of history that I took part in all that was done to have Massachusetts ready for the war, and Schouler did all he could to-have those facts forgotten. On the 15th of April, Cameron, Secretary of War, sent a requisition by telegraph to Governor Andrew, to send forward at once fifteen hundred men, and in the course of the same day a formal request was received for two full regiments. On that day I was trying a case beforehis was immediately done, and I left the court house at quarter before five, in time to reach my headquarters at Lowell by the five o'clock train. And that case, so continued, remains unfinished to this day. Being well acquainted with Secretary Cameron, as we had been Democrats together in the former years, I telegraphed him through Senator Wilson, then chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs:-- You have called for a brigade of Massachusetts troops; why not call for a brigadier-g
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
leased and allowed to go abroad. I endeavored to do my duty by him, however. Hearing that this application was to be made, I telegraphed the Secretary of War, Cameron, not to allow him to be released, at least not until I could be present and explain the depth of his guilt. But the release was by the order of the Secretary of n to my quarters I threw myself on my lounge, and burst into a flood of tears. But while I was before Scott, I did not even wink. Directly after this, I saw Mr. Cameron, the Secretary of War, and informed him that if I was no longer needed I intended to report home. He very kindly begged me not to do so. He said I would regret, with great respect, Yours, Winfield Scott. Upon receipt of that I wrote the Secretary of War the following letter:-- Baltimore, May 18, 1861. Hon. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War: Sir:--I have just received an order from General Scott transferring the command of the Department of Annapolis to General Cadwallader,
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
If he had read my letters to General Scott he would have seen that I was asking from him instructions how to deal with the whole question of negro slavery during the war. As I have already said, I have never claimed and never believed that contraband alone would cover that. That was the popular belief, not mine. I was asking Scott for instructions as to what I should do with the slave men, women, and children, sick and well, who came to me. I did not need any instructions from Scott or Cameron, neither of whom were lawyers, as to the legal question of the law of nations concerning captured slaves when used by their masters in actual warfare. The question put and argued in those letters was: What was I to do with the slave population of the whole country who came to me voluntarily, men, women, and children. I had $60,000 worth of them. That question included the slaves of loyal men. In this matter I wanted the sanction of the government. I had adopted a theory on this ques
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
believe, Captain, that these are the Twenty-Sixth's boys. Let me find out; I will give them the countersign. Mike, you fool, what countersign have you? Oh, aisy, Captain; and he stepped forth and cried out: Connicticut over the fince. The men on both sides broke out into roars of laughter, and all danger of a collision was averted. Meanwhile Governor Andrew, aided by the two Massachusetts senators, Sumner and Wilson, was doing everything he could to move the President and Secretary Cameron to interfere with my authority to make enlistments. The governor wrote most personal and abusive letters regarding me to the senators, and then published them. I do not think it affected Wilson much, because he had been a Whig, a Know-Nothing, and a Free-Soiler, according to the changes of parties, and did not take Abolitionism much to heart; but Mr. Sumner did everything he could do to disturb me and to serve Andrew. Sumner had plenty of leisure for this sort of thing. Although
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
Sept. 27, 1861. His story, page 91. I enclose a card just received from A. Lincoln. It shows too much deference to be seen outside. McClellan's letter, September, 1861. His story, page 91. At one time during the autumn of 1861, Secretary Cameron made quite an abolition speech to some newly arrived regiment. Next day Mr. Stanton urged me to arrest him for inciting insubordination. He often advocated the propriety of my seizing the government and taking affairs into my own hands. n and to put down the dictators, too. There was a crop of dictators about that time, there being several parties which wanted a dictator. One was composed of McClellan's political friends, the Copperheads, who thought there was danger that Mr. Cameron and President Lincoln would carry on the war so as to obliterate both the Rebellion and slavery. Their candidate for dictator, who should take the government, was McClellan. The other party were the over-zealous abolitionists who thought tha
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
ill hear it with regret. We shook hands and parted. Within three weeks afterwards, the Hon. Simon Cameron, who Simon Cameron. stood very high in Mr. Lincoln's confidence, came to me at FortresSimon Cameron. stood very high in Mr. Lincoln's confidence, came to me at Fortress Monroe. This was after a high position in the coming military campaign had been allotted me by General Grant, in the results of which I had the highest hope, and for which I had been laboring. CaCameron and myself had from the beginning of the war been in warm friendly relations and I owed much to him which I can never repay save with gratitude. Therefore, he spoke with directness. The PreI think you are sound in your judgment. The following is a statement of the matter made by Mr. Cameron during his lifetime:-- I had been summoned from Harrisburg by the President to consult witoln's fault and not Chase's that he is using the treasury against Lincoln. Right again, said Cameron; I will tell Mr. Lincoln every word you have said. What happened after that is history. P
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
, after it was known that Lincoln was elected, to 260, but immediately receded and never went so high again. On Monday, the 7th, I received a letter from Hon. Simon Cameron from Pennsylvania, asking what time I could see him, and where we could meet. The only intimation of his business was the statement contained in his letter change in regard to the treatment of the rebels which the President would get from me would be that I should act more promptly in punishing rebel offenders. Mr. Cameron said he had had a personal conversation with the President upon this subject, and that he was very sure that he would regret my determination. I replied to him that when I saw the President I believed that I could convince him that what I was doing was the best for himself and the best for his cause. Cameron answered: Well, General, you stick to your text like an old rusty weathercock. We discussed for a considerable time the political situation and also the condition of the war.
at Stanton is to go on the march, and you should take his flank. We will carry the State handsomely. Will telegraph you Wednesday morning. Your friend, Simon Cameron. Major-General Butler. [no. 92. see page 768.] Nov. 8, 1864. Hon. Simon Cameron: >My Dear Sir:--I may be here some days, certainly till after Wednesday.Hon. Simon Cameron: >My Dear Sir:--I may be here some days, certainly till after Wednesday. If you could come here then and come to the Hoffman House (my headquarters), I could make you very comfortable, and would be glad to see you. All is quiet here. The only thing we have to watch after election will be the gold operators who intend to run up the price till they can so affect the price of food and necessaries as to1, 1864. Dear General:--I will be in New York Saturday noon at the Astor. Will you please call there or drop me a note, and say where I shall call on you. Simon Cameron. General Butler. [no. 94. see page 770.] No. 57 West Washington place, New York, Nov. 19, 1864. General:--Supposing it possible that it may be of intere
o accept Major-General's commission, 242; on Frying Pan Shoals, 341-347; in New Orleans, 374. Butler, Zepheniah, grandfather of Benj. F., 40, 41, 48, 80. Butterfield, Gen., Daniel, advises and assists Butler, 759. Buzzell, John R., acquitted, 112. C Cadwallader, General, ordered to relieve Butler at Baltimore, 237, 240. CAeSAR, Butler reads, 868. Cahill, Col. T. W., at Baton Rouge, 482. Calvin, Butler controverts doctrine of, 60-63; his position sustained, 64. Cameron, Simon, Secretary of War, requisition for two Massachusetts regiments, 170; regarding Ross Winans, 234; urges Butler to remain in service, 239; letter to, 240; instructions regarding contrabands, 259-261; reference to General McClellan, 473; asks Butler to accept Vice-Presidency, 633-635; seeks an interview with Butler, 768-769. Canada, hostility of the Dominion, 966. Cape Ann, Butler's summer home at, 919. Cape Henry, transport fleet anchor off, 785-786. Cape Lookout, rendezvous of