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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 84 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 72 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 57 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 49 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 45 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 39 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 38 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 36 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Simon Cameron or search for Simon Cameron in all documents.

Your search returned 42 results in 12 document sections:

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 45: an antislavery policy.—the Trent case.—Theories of reconstruction.—confiscation.—the session of 1861-1862. (search)
Cochrane's address to his regiment. Nov. 13, 1861, with Mr. Cameron's approving remarks; Wendell Philips's lecture on The Wa in Speeches and Papers relating to the Rebellion, p. 123. Cameron's annual report in December, 1861. as prepared contained the object of the war, but simply one of its agencies. Mr. Cameron's instructions are practically a proclamation of freedomtinguished audience. The galleries were filled; Chase and Cameron of the Cabinet, and the foreign ministers (except Lord Lyote, without the customary reference, the confirmation of Mr. Cameron, then Secretary of War, as minister to Russia, and of E.ainst certain charges affecting his official integrity. Mr. Cameron was confirmed, with considerable opposition, however, frislavery man in the Cabinet, was always his cordial ally. Cameron, the retiring Secretary of War, and Stanton, who was soon ar from the President's own lips that he had stricken from Cameron's report its recommendation of the arming of slaves. Wo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 46: qualities and habits as a senator.—1862. (search)
mmunication between Governor Andrew and the government. The files of the governor's office at the State House contain many letters from Sumner on public business. Literary men as well as antislavery men, irrespective of the States they lived in, felt they had a special claim on Sumner. Motley was urgent with him for a mission, first at the Hague and then at Vienna. Fay hoped, though vainly, to be saved by him from the competition of place-seekers. Bayard Taylor, wishing to succeed Cameron at St. Petersburg, wrote from that capital, Aug. 18, 1862: Take my importunity in good part; there are so few senators who are scholars! It was a time when relatives were always at Washington on their way to look for wounded or sick soldiers, or to recover their bodies from fields and hospitals. Sumner, however much it might invade his time, was always glad to serve them by procuring passes or otherwise. When any of his friends met with bereavements, his habit was to send a letter of s
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
in a letter to Sumner mentioned that it had taken twenty and a half columns in the New York Tribune. A large edition was at once issued by the association before which Sumner spoke. The Address drew forth approval from the journals of the country, nearly always unqualified. Mr. Greeley made it the subject of a contribution to the Independent of New York. It called out grateful and enthusiastic expressions in numerous letters from citizens and public men, including Seward, Chase, Corwin, Cameron, and Senators Anthony and Howe; Senator Howe of Wisconsin wrote of it: Such conciseness of statement, such fulness of research, such wealth of illustration, such iron logic, heated but unmalleable, I really do not think are to be found in any other oration, ancient or modern. . . . No single man has ever so grandly struggled against the barbaric tendencies of a frightfully debauched generation. I cannot certainly foresee the future; you may be worsted in this encounter, but I know the w
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 50: last months of the Civil War.—Chase and Taney, chief-justices.—the first colored attorney in the supreme court —reciprocity with Canada.—the New Jersey monopoly.— retaliation in war.—reconstruction.—debate on Louisiana.—Lincoln and Sumner.—visit to Richmond.—the president's death by assassination.—Sumner's eulogy upon him. —President Johnson; his method of reconstruction.—Sumner's protests against race distinctions.—death of friends. —French visitors and correspondents.—1864-1865. (search)
tatesmanlike, and fanatical. The New York Times, in successive leaders, took positive ground against negro suffrage as any part of the reconstruction. March 2; June 3, 19, 21, 23, 24, 26, 28, 29. The Cincinnati Commercial printed eleven years later letters found in Andrew Johnson's office at Greenville, Tenn., after his death, which approved his policy of reconstruction at the outset. Among them were letters and telegrams from George Bancroft, James Gordon Bennett, Henry J. Raymond, Simon Cameron, and W. H. Seward. Charles A. Dana, then an editor in Chicago, wrote to Sumner that it was advisable to keep with the President as far as possible in order to prevent the Democrats coming into power through any unnecessary quarrel among ourselves. His journal, the Chicago Republican, justified President Johnson's exclusion of the colored people from his plan of reconstruction. John W. Forney of the Philadelphia Press, a partisan of the President, who had come also to be an admirer of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 52: Tenure-of-office act.—equal suffrage in the District of Columbia, in new states, in territories, and in reconstructed states.—schools and homesteads for the Freedmen.—purchase of Alaska and of St. Thomas.—death of Sir Frederick Bruce.—Sumner on Fessenden and Edmunds.—the prophetic voices.—lecture tour in the West.—are we a nation?1866-1867. (search)
o whom Sumner seems to have been personally attracted, was allowed every opportunity to press the treaty. He was heard before the committee on foreign relations,—an unusual proceeding; he employed counsel, distributed a plea for the purchase in a pamphlet written by James Parton, gave dinners, called on Sumner almost daily, and made himself agreeable in the society of the capital. But all this was of no avail; he made no converts. None of the members of the committee,—Sumner, Fessenden, Cameron, Harlan, Morton, Patterson, or Casserly,— no senator, no one else in Washington, save Mr. Seward alone, saw anything to be gained by the purchase. The House of Representatives having learned what was going on passed, Nov. 25, 1867, a resolution by more than a two-thirds vote against any further purchases of territory, which was intended, as the debate shows, as a protest against the negotiation. President Grant, when he came into office in March, 1869, dismissed the scheme summarily, sayi<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, chapter 10 (search)
nanimity rare in the election of senators, and contrasting with the long and close contest which first sent him to the Senate,— his vote in the State Senate being thirty-seven out of thirty-nine votes cast, and in the House, two hundred and sixteen out of two hundred and thirty-two. He was now to be the senator of longest continuous service in the distinguished body which he entered in 1851, Wade entered the Senate at the same time with Sumner, but his term was to expire March 4, 1869. Cameron and Hamlin entered the Senate earlier than Sumner, but their service had been broken by intervals. The New York Tribune, March 4, 1869, comments on Wade's retirement. and he had been since 1861 its most conspicuous presence. The strength of his position was generally recognized through the country in tributes from the public journals. Washington Chronicle, Jan. 20, 1869. Henry B. Anthony, senator from Island, a conservative by temperament and associations, contributed as editor to the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 55: Fessenden's death.—the public debt.—reduction of postage.— Mrs. Lincoln's pension.—end of reconstruction.—race discriminations in naturalization.—the Chinese.—the senator's record.—the Cuban Civil War.—annexation of San Domingo.—the treaties.—their use of the navy.—interview with the presedent.—opposition to the annexation; its defeat.—Mr. Fish.—removal of Motley.—lecture on Franco-Prussian War.—1869-1870. (search)
Schurz, who had taken his seat in March, 1869, was, at Sumner's instance, put in Fessenden's place on the committee on foreign relations, the other members being Cameron, Harlan, Morton, Patterson, and Casserly. Sumner was also a member of two other committees,—on the District of Columbia, and on the revision of the laws. The seMarch 11, when Babcock was present at its meeting to explain them. Four day later it made a report adverse to a ratification, in which Sumner, Patterson, Schurz, Cameron, and Casserly joined. Cameron, however, explained at the time that under some circumstances he might hereafter vote for annexation. The minority, who were in faCameron, however, explained at the time that under some circumstances he might hereafter vote for annexation. The minority, who were in favor of ratification, were Morton and Harlan. Ferry moved, with Sumner supporting him, that the treaties be considered in open session of the Senate; but the motion did not prevail. The debate began on the 24th. The tenor of debates in secret session is obtained by correspondents, who ply the senators with inquiries and receive
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
ts majority being Howe, Nye, and Pool) placed Cameron instead of Sumner at the head of the foreign in the Senate the adoption of the list, with Cameron at the head of the committee on foreign relatn and Measures of Half a Century, p. 353. Cameron, who succeeded Sumner, was by general opiniond him in executive session; and whatever were Cameron's faults, he never forgot a favor, and was nee they parted with a mutual God bless you! Cameron in the Senate, April 28, 1874. Congressional Globe, p. 3434. Cameron lived to a great are, and to the end was always ready to testify to Sumner removal, in the Senate, April 28, 1874, when Cameron, Howe, and Anthony recurred to the subject, w with the duties of ordinary legislation Mr. Cameron secured action on all but one of the treati he invoked the attention of his successor, Mr. Cameron, March 13 (Globe, p. 66). At this as at thers to the London Times, Feb. 14 and 15, 1872. Cameron also moved amendments; but the Senate as well
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 57: attempts to reconcile the President and the senator.—ineligibility of the President for a second term.—the Civil-rights Bill.—sale of arms to France.—the liberal Republican party: Horace Greeley its candidate adopted by the Democrats.—Sumner's reserve.—his relations with Republican friends and his colleague.—speech against the President.—support of Greeley.—last journey to Europe.—a meeting with Motley.—a night with John Bright.—the President's re-election.—1871-1872. (search)
ly have been adjusted; but the two Presidents were constituted differently. Cameron in the Senate, Feb. 29, 1872, noted this difference (Congressional Globe, p. 1e was a tie vote on Sumner's amendment Among those voting yea were Anthony, Cameron, Chandler, Conkling, Frelinghuysen, Hamlin, Harlan, Morrill (Vermont). Morton,arlan said of Sumner that he was as patriotic as any member of the Senate; and Cameron paid a tribute to his magnanimity, justice, and intelligence. Conkling had foublic service. His close alliance with certain leaders in Congress,—Conkling, Cameron, Chandler, and Carpenter in the Senate, and Butler in the House,—whom he allowr 3) to introduce a resolution in commemoration of Mr. Greeley was defeated by Cameron's insisting on his motion to adjourn, so that Sumner's proposed tribute to Mr.; but it was revived again in 1880, when the scheme was supported by Conkling, Cameron, Logan, and Fish. The better sentiment of the country was aroused against it,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 59: cordiality of senators.—last appeal for the Civil-rights bill. —death of Agassiz.—guest of the New England Society in New York.—the nomination of Caleb Cushing as chief-justice.—an appointment for the Boston custom-house.— the rescinding of the legislative censure.—last effort in debate.—last day in the senate.—illness, death, funeral, and memorial tributes.—Dec. 1, 1873March 11, 1874. (search)
Vienna, could only succeed under the direct patronage and supervision of the United States government. He followed the bill closely, and on two different days (February 27, and Friday, March 6) spoke at length Congressional Globe, pp. 1830-1833, 2025-2027. in favor of further consideration and another reference to a committee. The Senate agreed with him, and voted the reference March 6. He was on that day full of spirit and earnestness. His contention with the Pennsylvania senators (Cameron and Scott) was sharp; though friendly. Flanagan of Texas, Another Flanagan, son of the senator, when defending the spoils system in the Republican national convention of 1880, asked, What are we up here for? however, who followed him, and closed the debate on Friday, reminded him of his recent divergence from his party, and his failure to pull his State from her solid moorings. Sumner's remarks on that day were his last words in the Senate. His last words with Thurman referred to th
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