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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
use the insults and inhumanities to which he was subjected by those to whose custody he was committed as a prisoner of State, or the cruelty of those who so long denied the constitutional right of a speedy and impartial trial. These wrongs it is our duty to forgive, but it is also our duty not to forget. Charles M. Blackford. Lynchburg, Va., July 18, 1900. The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. An address delivered before A. P. Hill Camp Confederate Veterans, by ex-governor William Evelyn Cameron, at Petersburg, Va., January 19th, 1901. Such men have lived to teach this truth— And it is truth, I know- That other men may reach those heights Whereon all virtues grow. Comrades: Not unmindful of the magnitude of the task your partial judgment has assigned to me—diffident of my power to clothe your love and reverence for Robert Lee in adequate phrase—I have yet accepted your invitation as a command, to which neither inclination nor duty could remain irresponsive; and <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. (search)
The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. An address delivered before A. P. Hill Camp Confederate Veterans, by ex-governor William Evelyn Cameron, at Petersburg, Va., January 19th, 1901. Such men have lived to teach this truth— And it is truth, I know- That other men may reach those heights Whereon all virtues grow. Comrades: Not unmindful of the magnitude of the task your partial judgment has assigned to me—diffident of my power to clothe your love and reverence for Robert Lee in adequate phrase—I have yet accepted your invitation as a command, to which neither inclination nor duty could remain irresponsive; and I throw myself upon your generous indulgence as in sober speech I try to portray to you The man he was who held a nation's heart in thrall. Robert E. Lee was born in the purple of an illustrious lineage, at a time when the recent death of the Cincinnatus of the West had flooded the name of Washington with a sunset's glory. He was reared upon the soil and am<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
ost, but all his companies manoeuvred well and delivered their fires with great effect. I do not believe that I have informed you in any of my letters that Colonel Cameron, of one of the Pennsylvania regiments, had been killed, and that his brother, Lincoln's Secretary of War, had sent a friend, one Arnold Harris, a lobby member today. Beaten there the enemy may retreat both upon Richmond and the Shenandoah Valley. I may reinforce him (Patterson) to enable you to bay Johnston. Secretary Cameron to Governor Curtin, July 18: The Pennsylvania troops were expected to have joined the forces going into battle this week. I trust there will be no deleneral Cooper, Manassas, July 21: Night has closed upon a hard fought field. Our forces have won a glorious victory. Colonel Kerigan, at Alexandria, to Cameron, July 22: There are about 7,000 men here without officers; nothing but confusion. General Mansfield, to Captain Mott at the Chain Bridge, July 22:
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
outhern cause. [from the Petersburg, Va., Index-appeal, February 24, 1903.] Happily and logically Pleaded in a touching address before R. E. Lee Camp, Confederate veterans, Richmond, Va., on the evening of February 20th, 1903, by Hon. William Evelyn Cameron, Ex-Governor of Virginia, in presenting to the Camp a portrait of Governor James Lawson Kemper, Major-General Confederate States Army. Ex-Governor William E. Cameron presented a magnificent portrait of General James Lawson Kemper, Ex-Governor William E. Cameron presented a magnificent portrait of General James Lawson Kemper, Confederate States Army, and ex-Governor of Virginia, to R. E. Lee Camp on the night of the 20th. The gathering was the most attractive and the most distinguished held by this organization in years. It was a reunion of the living Governors of the old Commonwealth in honor of one of its chief executives, who is dead. Governor Charles T. O'Ferrall accepted the portrait in behalf of the Camp. Both speeches were made to a great gathering of the most representative men of the Confederacy now livi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
17. Beall, J. Gates, execution of, 262. Blackford, Captain C. M., 279. Black Horse Troop, Reminiscences of, 142. Blaine, J. G. 78. Bombshell, Captured the, 211. Boonsboro Md., 145. Breathed, Major, James, Sketch of, 346. Brown. John Young, 188; Colonel Ridgeley, killed, 215. Buck. Captain S. D., 104, 371. Buckingham Yancey Guard, 154. Buckner, General S. B., 117. Butler, General B. F., 95; at New Orleans, La., 188; infamous order of, 194; Hon. W. E., 860. Cameron, Hon. W, E., 360. Cedar Creek, Battle of, 184; losses at, 109, 371. Chambersburg, Pa., 266. Chesterfield troops, monument to, 161. Chickamauga, Battle of, 178. Christian, Hon. G. L., 77. Clark, Surgeon A. M.. 89. Cobb, General, Howell, 82. Cobden. Richard, 6. Confederacy Last forlorn hope of, in TransMississippi Department, 117. Confederate-dead in the North, 230; Defeat, causes of, 368; Surgeons, humanity of, 230; gold in 1865, 119. Colston, General R. E., 111. Const