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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 84 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 72 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 57 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 49 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 45 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 39 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 38 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 36 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Simon Cameron or search for Simon Cameron in all documents.

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n a hopeless task. To call a people who possess more men and more guns, and more means of raising men and guns, than another, rebels, and to call those who are inferior in all these points, the only true men, is to talk nor Lincoln and his Cabinet must see this were they either statesmen or honest men, or men of common humanity, they would put an end to the shedding of blood, and the situation which they cannot make better by a century of war. But neither Lincoln, nor Seward, nor Cameron not Chase, is a wise statesman or patriot. Their whole character and the cause of the whole war, may be dispatched in four words. They Are All Speculators and lock upon the war as a The feeling exclamation of Lincoln, What is to become of my revenue! gives a key to the history of his whole reign. It is a war for money — a war of contractors for army supplies — a war of sharpers and stock brokers — a war in which every man who can get the ear of the Cabinets hopes to make himself <
f boats and other means of disembarkation are believed to be capable of landing at once from three to four thousand men. Some of the surf boats carry one hundred men. The expedition consists of three brigades, commanded by Generals Wright, Stevens, and Viele, each well furnished with artillery. Full orders are given as to the mode of landing, and if those first landing have to conquer the ground and succeed, they are directed not to go beyond supporting distance from shore. Simon Cameron, in a letter to the commander of the expedition, gives him authority to employ negroes, but assures all loyal masters that Congress will provide just compensation for the loss of service of persons so employed. The New York Herald, of the 29th, says the objects expected to be realized by the expedition, are reported to be-- First--To carry the war into the cotton States, which are chiefly responsible for the rebellion, and produce the disorganization and diversion of the immen