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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Francis Campbell or search for Francis Campbell in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 3.-attack on the defences of Mobile. (search)
Ewan, amputation arm; Acting Master's Mate R. P. Herrick, slightly; Acting Ensign W. H. Heginbotham, severely, (since dead;) Wilder Venner, landsman, leg; Adolphus Pulle, seaman, severe flesh wounds, legs; Hiram Elder, seaman, right leg; R. Dumphery, coal-heaver, both arms; Wm. Thompson, ordinary seaman, one leg; E. Johnson, boy, contusion, side; Walter Lloyd, boy, leg; M. Forbes, captain mizzen-top, contusion, side; Wm. Stanley, seaman, contusion and on leg; C. Stevenson, boy, contusion; F. Campbell, seaman, contusion; Wm. Doyle, boy, contusion, side; Auguste Simmons, landsman; Peter Pitts, boy; Michael Fayal, landsman; David Ortin; Wm. Trask, left leg; Charles Dennis, both arms; Thomas O'Connell, right hand off. Total, twenty-three. Congratulatory letter to rear-admiral Farragut. Navy Department, Washington, August 15, 1864. sir: Your despatch of the fifth instant, stating that you had, on the morning of that day, entered Mobile Bay, passing between Forts Morgan and Gaine
ith, landsman; Louis McLane, seaman; Benjamin Harper, seaman; James B. Osgood, ordinary seaman; Adolphus Pulle, seaman; Thomas Bayne, ordinary seaman; John C. Scott, ordinary seaman; Thomas Stanton, seaman; James Alexander, landsman; Henry Clark, first-class boy; Wm. E. Andrews, Captain After-Guard; Frederick Munsell, landsman; George Walker, landsman; Thomas Wildes, landsman; George Stillwell, nurse; David Morrow, Quarter-Gunner; Peter Duncan, coal-heaver; Andrew E. Smith, coal-heaver; Francis Campbell, second-class fireman; Charles Stevenson, second-class boy; David Curtin, landsman. Severely Wounded — Wilder Verner, landsman; M. C. Forbes, Captain Top; Michael Fanya, landsman; James S. Geddis, landsman <*> Wm. G. Trask, ordinary seaman; Wm. A. Stanley, seaman; Thomas O'Connell, coal-heaver; James R. Garrison, coal-heaver; E. E. Johnson, first-class boy; George E. Fleke, first-class boy; Charles Dennis, (colored,) landsman; Auguste Simmons, ordinary seaman; William Thompson, first
had to circumstance or condition. The rebel sharp-shooters were untiring and vigilant. Of two men, carrying a wounded comrade, one was killed, the other wounded, and the wounded man again shot by these miscreants. Balls whistled over the fort into the hospital. Nothing was sacred or secure. Sanders was ubiquitous; his gallantry and daring became infectious. Each man of his command emulated his comrade in deeds of bravery. These men, for four days and nights, had stood in the front at Campbell's, and now here, without sleep and almost without food, yet hour after hour unrelieved. They stood up like heroes, every man of them, and amid that hell of shot, gave blow for blow and shout for shout. The old mountain wolf, Colonel Wolford, with his grim and stolid courage, was there. Colonel Bond, at the head of his glorious regiment. the One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois, with his smiling, earnest face, was where the conflict raged the fiercest, encouraging his men, if possible, to de