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red his route and galloped away immediately, taking the roundabout way of Blackland to Baldwin. This statement was made in the presence of several officers, and was entirely voluntary and unasked for. Colonel Elliott arrived at Booneville on the thirtieth of May, at two o'clock A. M. He remained secreted in the woods east of the railroad until daylight, when he moved down upon the town, and was met by a body of about two hundred rebel cavalry, who incontinently fled at a volley from Captain Campbell's Second Michigan revolving rifles. This was the only resistance Colonel Elliott encountered. He found in the town about eight hundred well soldiers and two thousand sick and convalescent; but none were inclined to oppose him. On the contrary, at least five hundred wished to go back with him as prisoners, but it was impossible for him to take them. The two thousand sick and convalescent found by Colonel Elliott were in the most shocking condition. The living and the putrid dead we
Bull Run: At one o'clock A. M., on the twenty-ninth, we left Manassas for Bull Run. Arriving on the battle-field, we were immediately ordered to support Captain Campbell's battery of Gibbon's brigade, which was then moving down to the engagement. A line of battle was formed in rear of the battery, in which position we remain the approach of the enemy. During the time fifteen of my command were wounded. After returning, we were ordered to take position toward our left to support Capt. Campbell's battery of Gibbon's brigade. We held the position for some time, driving back the .enemy with great loss by discharges from Capt. Campbell's battery. We lCapt. Campbell's battery. We lost one man killed and three wounded at that place. We were then ordered to take a position on a hill some distance east. The movement was made in fine order. After remaining a short time, we were ordered to take position on our extreme left, where we remained until about ten o'clock at night, when we, in connection with the en
Bull Run: At one o'clock A. M., on the twenty-ninth, we left Manassas for Bull Run. Arriving on the battle-field, we were immediately ordered to support Captain Campbell's battery of Gibbon's brigade, which was then moving down to the engagement. A line of battle was formed in rear of the battery, in which position we remain the approach of the enemy. During the time fifteen of my command were wounded. After returning, we were ordered to take position toward our left to support Capt. Campbell's battery of Gibbon's brigade. We held the position for some time, driving back the .enemy with great loss by discharges from Capt. Campbell's battery. We lCapt. Campbell's battery. We lost one man killed and three wounded at that place. We were then ordered to take a position on a hill some distance east. The movement was made in fine order. After remaining a short time, we were ordered to take position on our extreme left, where we remained until about ten o'clock at night, when we, in connection with the en
ve the field, but would return in a short time. I had given particular instructions to Capt. J. A. Campbell, my Assistant Adjutant-General, to post Gen. Jackson's two brigades on a commanding piece, Sixteenth United States infantry, Lieut. Colonel E. Bassett Langdon, Inspector-General; Capt. J. A. Campbell, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. W. T. Hoblitzell, Aid-de-Camp; Lieut. S. W. Davies, Aie nation is called upon to mourn the loss of such spirits as Jackson, Terrell, Webster, Jewett, Campbell, Berryhill, Herrell, and others, who fell upon this bloody field. A list of killed and woundedh division, First corps army of the Ohio, in camp near Crab orchard, Ky., Oct. 15, 1862. Captain J. A. Campbell, A. A.A. G., First Army Corps: I have the honor to submit the following report of theu's report. headquarters Third division army of the Ohio, in the field, October 17. Captain J. A. Campbell, A. A.A. G. First Corps d'armee, Army of the Ohio: sir: I have the honor to submit th
d me, and his gallantry and courage were conspicuous. He was killed at my side, assisting me to rally the troops. Lieut.-Col. Stewart, commanding the Second Indiana, was foremost in the charge, and exhibited great coolness and courage. Captain Leabo, Second Indiana, had command of four companies of his regiment and handled them well, but was taken prisoner early in the action. Capt. Starr, with his company, (C,) did good execution. Major Winfrey, Captain Duncan and his company, Lieuts. Campbell and Cheeck, Capt. Carter and his company, all of the Fifth Kentucky, behaved well and managed their troops with skill, and proved themselves gallant men. My loss was thirty killed, fifty wounded, and seventy-five taken prisoners. About two hundred horses were killed or disabled in this action. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General. Major Winfrey's report. Louisville, Ky., September 8, 1862. Messrs. Editors: Not having an opportu