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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
tellectual product of an ideal. Without the ideal there is no statecraft. Statecraft involving the efficiency of the Confederate war office did not suggest John A. Campbell for Assistant Secretary of War, yet Campbell held the place until the end in the face of his avowal to the President that he had no sympathy with the motivesCampbell held the place until the end in the face of his avowal to the President that he had no sympathy with the motives of the Confederacy. (Letter of Campbell to Judge Curtis.) The Senator from Georgia, Benjamin H. Hill, was notoriously the friend and counsellor of Mr. Davis, yet within thirty days of the meeting of the Confederate Congress at Montgomery, Mr. Hill had denounced bitterly the Southern movement. There was never a day when he eitheCampbell to Judge Curtis.) The Senator from Georgia, Benjamin H. Hill, was notoriously the friend and counsellor of Mr. Davis, yet within thirty days of the meeting of the Confederate Congress at Montgomery, Mr. Hill had denounced bitterly the Southern movement. There was never a day when he either expected or desired the Confederacy to live. (Life and Speeches of B. H. Hill, by his son.) Rhett, Yancey and Wigfall. Neither text-page or index of the five octave volumes prepared by Mr. Davis and his wife, purporting to relate the tale of the rise and fall of the Confederacy and the parts acted by many persons, contains
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The ironclad ram Virginia-Confederate States Navy, [from the Richmond, Va., News-leader, April 1, 1904.] (search)
When the Virginia steamed over from Norfolk to engage the Federal fleet, her officers were: Flag officer, Franklin Buchanan; executive, Lieutenant Catesby A. R. Jones; lieutenants, Charles C. Simms, R. D. Minor, Hunter Davidson, J. Taylor Wood, J. R. Eggleston and Walter Butt; midshipmen, Fonte, Marmaduke, Littlepage, Craig, Long and Roote; paymaster, James Semple; surgeon, Dinwiddie B. Phillips; assistant surgeon, Algernon S. Garnett; captain of marines, Reuben Thom; engineers, H. A. Ramsey; acting chief, Tynan, Campbell, Hening, Jack and White; boatswain, Hasker; gunner, Oliver; carpenter, Lindsey; clerk, Arthur Sinclair, Jr.; volunteer aid, Lieutenant Douglas F. Forrest; Confederate States army, Captain Kevill, commanding detachment of Norfolk United Artillery; signal corps, Sergeant Tabb. [Our impression is that this list is incomplete; that Dr. Bennett Wood Green served on the Virginia as assistant surgeon, and the late Virginius Newton of Richmond, as midshipman.—editor.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
ne, and works in Charleston harbor commanding it were erected or extended, to prevent its relief or reinforcement. General Scott advised its evacuation as a military necessity, and Wm. H. Seward, Mr. Lincoln's Secretary of State, assured Judge John A. Campbell, of the Supreme Court, that Fort Sumter will be evacuated in the next five days, and in reply to a note from Judge Campbell reminding him of this fact Seward replied briefly: Faith as to Sumter fully kept; wait and see, and this though heJudge Campbell reminding him of this fact Seward replied briefly: Faith as to Sumter fully kept; wait and see, and this though he knew that a large fleet with supplies and strong reinforcements for Sumter had already sailed. It is a matter of interest, and worthy of memory, that the right of secession and the duty of the United States Government to withdraw its forces from the seceded territory were admitted by very distinguished Abolitionist authority. By no less a person than Wendell Phillips of Massachusetts, the great and able Abolitionist, the silver tongued orator, the distinguished scholar, the bold, uncompromi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
11; private, 114. Bloody Angle, The, 200. Booth, J. W., Why he shot Lincoln, 99. Bragg, General Braxton, 127. Braxton's Battery, 240. Breast-plates in Federal Army, 221. Brown, Execution of John, 279. Buchanan, Admiral Franklin, 244. Buchanan, President Against Coercion, 31. Buell, General Don Carlos, 124, 131. Bullock, Captain James D., 114. Burnside, General A. E., 265. Burton, General H. W., 346. Caddall, J. B., 174. Calhoun, John C., 28, 106. Campbell, John A, 107. Cameran, W. E., 347. Carrington, Colonel H. A., Sketch of, 216. Carter, Colonel, killed, 8. Carter, Lieutenant Henry C., wounded, 6. Carter, Colonel Thomas H., 233. Cedar Creek, Battle of, 223; forces at, 225; casualties in, 231. Cavalry, Reorganization of, in 1862, 6 Chamberlain, General J. L., 355. Chambersburg, Burning of, 93. Chandler, Colonel C., killed, 336. Charlotte Rifles, 18th Va., 216. Chase, Salmon P., 29. Chattanooga, Location