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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 12 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 46 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 2 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 27 11 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 22 6 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 21 9 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 17 15 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 15 11 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 13 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 12 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Canby or search for Canby in all documents.

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restore Texas, and that part of Louisiana held by the enemy, to the Union in the shortest practicable time, in a way most effectual for securing permanent peace. To do this, you will be given all the troops that can be spared by MajorGeneral Canby, probably twenty-five thousand men of all arms; the troops with Major-General J. J. Reynolds, in Arkansas, say twelve thousand, Reynolds to command; the Fourth Army Corps, now at Nashville, Tennessee, awaiting orders; and the Twenty-Fifth Army Cohe beginning of the campaign of 1864 till the white flag came into their hands at Appomattox Court House. I went first to St. Louis, and there took the steamboat for New Orleans, and when near the mouth of the Red River received word from General Canby that Kirby Smith had surrendered under terms similar to those accorded Lee and Johnston. But the surrender was not carried out in good faith, particularly by the Texas troops, though this I did not learn till some little time afterward, whe