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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 9, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for George Canning or search for George Canning in all documents.

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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), The conflict with slavery (search)
for 1832. But we have yet stronger evidence. The total abolishment of slavery in the southern republics has proved beyond dispute the safety and utility of immediate abolition. The departed Bolivar indeed deserves his glorious title of Liberator, for he began his career of freedom by striking off the fetters of his own slaves, seven hundred in number. In an official letter from the Mexican Envoy of the British Government, dated Mexico, March, 1826, and addressed to the Right Hon. George Canning, the superiority of free over slave labor is clearly demonstrated by the following facts:— 1. The sugar and coffee cultivation of Mexico is almost exclusively confined to the great valley of Ceurnavaca and Cauntala Amilpas. 2. It is now carried on exclusively by the labor of free blacks. 3. It was formerly wholly sustained by the forced labor of slaves, purchased at Vera Cruz at $300 to $400 each. 4. Abolition in this section was effected not by governmental interference,