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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 10 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Henry D. Capers or search for Henry D. Capers in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
nd others, in Athens—Captain Bamwell, Colonel Magruder, and others, in Rome-General Capers, Colonel Montgomery, and others, in Greenville—all did their best to make oe P. Harrison, Jr., the Twelfth and Eighteenth Georgia battalions, Lieutenant-Colonel H. D. Capers and Major W. S. Basinger, and a battalion from the First Volunteer Committee to confer with our General Agent for Tennessee, and Kentucky (Colonel H. D. Capers), Captain Robt. A. Cox offered the folllowing, which was unanimously adoSoldiers Association have become aware of the presence at Nashville of Colonel Henry D. Capers, General Agent of the Southern Historical Soeiety, an institution whos independence, it is therefore Resolved, That this Association extend to Colonel Capers, as the representative of the Southern Historical Society, a cordial welcoere met at the boat by the committee, who were introduced by our friend, Colonel H. D. Capers, and were at once taken possession of so cordially that the salute fired
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
emory of our heroes living and dead. Our printers report our space all filled, and we must reluctantly leave out what we had to say of Augusta, Athens, Rome, and Greenville, S. C., at all of which places we met a cordial greeting, and were placed under high obligations for courtesies freely extended. But we must say, that Colonel C. C. Jones, Jr., and the committee in Augusta—Dr. Newton, Captain Charlton, and others, in Athens—Captain Bamwell, Colonel Magruder, and others, in Rome-General Capers, Colonel Montgomery, and others, in Greenville—all did their best to make our visits pleasant, and the lecture a success, and that the Greenville News but voiced the general feeling at all of these places when it said the morning of our arrival: General Lee! Greenville welcomes you to-day with the heartiness born of loyalty to the cause you represent, of love for the name you bear, and of honor for the fame you won, when fame was gained with bared breast and blade, fearless heart, and p<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
war, but of its privations, its hardships, its perils, and, it may be added, its lessons of self-abnegation and of devotion to duty. Early in the month of July, 1863, while stationed very comfortably at the Isle of Hope, a courier, spurring in hot haste, brought orders from department headquarters that set our camp at once in a turmoil of eager and excited preparation. The Thirty-second Georgia, Colonel George P. Harrison, Jr., the Twelfth and Eighteenth Georgia battalions, Lieutenant-Colonel H. D. Capers and Major W. S. Basinger, and a battalion from the First Volunteer regiment of Georgia, were ordered to proceed with the least possible delay to Savannah, there to take cars for Charleston. A private note at the same time brought the intelligence that that city, so long threatened, and indeed, once already assailed by sea, was now to undergo a vigorous and combined attack from both land and naval forces. The day was an eventful one to us without this additional stimulant.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
urer, Colonel Jno. P. Maguire, Nashville. At a recent meeting of their Executive Committee to confer with our General Agent for Tennessee, and Kentucky (Colonel H. D. Capers), Captain Robt. A. Cox offered the folllowing, which was unanimously adopted: Whereas, the Tennessee Soldiers Association have become aware of the presence at Nashville of Colonel Henry D. Capers, General Agent of the Southern Historical Soeiety, an institution whose labor for the past ten years has resulted in the proper presentation to the impartial world of the record made by the people of the Southern States during their struggle for independence, it is therefore Resolved, That this Association extend to Colonel Capers, as the representative of the Southern Historical Society, a cordial welcome to Nashville and to Tennessee. That we heartily sympathize with the noble mission which has enlisted his sympathies, and will aid him to extend the work and the influence of his Society among our peopl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
is and up the Mississippi. The trip would have been a very tedious one; but the courtesy of Captain W. A. Joplin, (an old Bedford, Virginia, Confederate,) and his polite officers of the steamer Rene Macready, made our time pass very pleasantly, and the sight of the Mississippi, forty miles wide at that point, was very interesting to us, though not so to the poor sufferers by the flood. Arriving at Memphis we were met at the boat by the committee, who were introduced by our friend, Colonel H. D. Capers, and were at once taken possession of so cordially that the salute fired in honor of General Lee's arrival was entirely unnecessary to assure us of a cordial welcome. Of our elegant apartments and entertainment at the Peabody House, our drives, dinners, lunches, suppers, concerts, receptions, &c., we have not space to speak. Suffice it to say that Major Thomas F. Tobin, chairman of the Committee of Arrangements, Major S. W. Hampton, General Colton Greene, General Gordon, Judge He
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
t, at which there will be speeches and a good time generally. renewals would be doubly acceptable just now because we cannot reasonably look for many new subscribers until December. We need the money due us, and we beg again that our friends will save themselves and us further trouble by remitting at once. And your own remittance will be all the more acceptable if you will induce others to remit along with you. We hope that none of our present subscribers will consent to allow their names to be stricken from our rolls; but, if from any cause, they do not propose to renew, then let them notify us to that effect, and be sure to return any Papers they have received to which they are not entitled. Colonel H. D. Capers is not now an Agent of the Southern Historical Society, and has not been since May last, and we are in no way responsible for his acts. We deeply regret being forced to make this statement, and hope that we will not be put to the necessity of making it more explicit.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ch. our Lee number (containing Hon. John W. Daniel's superb oration, an account of the unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent Statue, a beautiful cut of the statue, and much other interesting and valuable matter concerning our grand old chief) has had a wide sale, and has met with universal and enthusiastic approval. We have some copies left which we mail for fifty cents each (regular price for a double number of our Papers), and we would advise those wishing them to order at once. Colonel H. D. Capers, as we announced in our November number, has not been authorized to act as our agent since last May. We regret that his course since that announcement compels us to advert to the matter again, and to warn our friends everywhere not to receive him as our agent, or to pay money to him on our account. The Southern Historical Society will not be responsible henceforth for any of his acts. crowded out has been the fate of quite a number of interesting and valuable articles which we ha