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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for French Captain or search for French Captain in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the landing of about three thousand troops. About half way from the bluff to the river, in an open field, a thin line of skirmishers represented the Southern side; on the road in the rear of the General, laid, perdue, the Southern boys, in line of battle. The yankees landed and took their time to come into action. Squads of officers rode here and there, knotting and unknotting with the grace that staff officers so well know how to display. A puff of white smoke from the gun of a French Captain, of the New Orleans regular heavy artillery, a shell bursting in the midst of it, untied one of the knots double quick, and strange to say consultations were put an end to by spread-eagleism hunting the grass. Then the gunboats opened fire, concentrating on the Frenchman, until 180 shots, by count, had tried to silence the plucky eight-inch shell gun. At last the barbette carriage of the shell gun was struck, and the gun dismounted, but soon mounted again and made ready for action.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
the landing of about three thousand troops. About half way from the bluff to the river, in an open field, a thin line of skirmishers represented the Southern side; on the road in the rear of the General, laid, perdue, the Southern boys, in line of battle. The yankees landed and took their time to come into action. Squads of officers rode here and there, knotting and unknotting with the grace that staff officers so well know how to display. A puff of white smoke from the gun of a French Captain, of the New Orleans regular heavy artillery, a shell bursting in the midst of it, untied one of the knots double quick, and strange to say consultations were put an end to by spread-eagleism hunting the grass. Then the gunboats opened fire, concentrating on the Frenchman, until 180 shots, by count, had tried to silence the plucky eight-inch shell gun. At last the barbette carriage of the shell gun was struck, and the gun dismounted, but soon mounted again and made ready for action.