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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 39 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 7 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 7 5 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. (search)
her. Notwithstanding her tub-like model and the inefficiency of her engine, Captain Carlin, commanding a blockade-runner, took charge of her in an attack against the torpedoes of one hundred pounds each. The lateral spars suggested by you, Captain Carlin declined to use, as they would interfere very seriously with the movements attack was very dark, and the New Ironsides was not seen until quite near. Captain Carlin immediately made for her; but her side being oblique to the direction of hid some delay occurred before it was pried off. During this critical period, Captain Carlin, in answer to threats and inquiries, declared his boat to be the Live Yankewith dispatches for the admiral. This deception was not discovered until after Carlin had backed out and his vessel was lost in the darkness. Shortly after this bold attempt of Captain Carlin, in the summer of 1863, to blow up the S New Ironsides, Mr. Theodore Stoney, Dr. Ravenel, and other gentlemen of Charleston, had built
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Preparations for battle-thomas Carries the first line of the enemy-sherman Carries Missionary Ridge--battle of Lookout Mountain--General Hooker's fight (search)
ut all day as to hide whatever was going on from the view of those below, settled down and made it so dark where Hooker was as to stop operations for the time. At four o'clock Hooker reported his position as impregnable. By a little after five direct communication was established, and a brigade of troops was sent from Chattanooga to reinforce him. These troops had to cross Chattanooga Creek and met with some opposition, but soon overcame it, and by night the commander, General [William P.] Carlin, reported to Hooker and was assigned to his left. I now telegraphed to Washington: The fight to-day progressed favorably. Sherman carried the end of Missionary Ridge, and his right is now at the tunnel, and his left at Chickamauga Creek. Troops from Lookout Valley carried the point of the mountain, and now hold the eastern slope and a point high up.3 Hooker reports two thousand prisoners taken, besides which a small number have fallen into our hands from Missionary Ridge. The next day t
discover some danger of loss, and be off about the time it came to taking their places? And suppose the people attempt to suspend, by refusing to pay; what then? The collectors would just jerk up their horses and cows, and the like, and sell them to the highest bidder for silver in hand, without valuation or redemption. Why, Shields didn't believe that story himself: it was never meant for the truth. If it was true, why was it not writ till five days after the proclamation? Why didn't Carlin and Carpenter sign it as well as Shields? Answer me that, Aunt ‘Becca. I say it's a lie, and not a well told one at that. It grins out like a copper dollar; Shields is a fool as well as a liar. With him truth is out of the question; and as for getting a good, bright, passable lie out of him, you might as well try to strike fire from a cake of tallow. I stick to it, it's all an infernal Whig lie! A Whig lie! Highty tighty! Yes, a Whig lie; and it's just like everything the cursed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
her. Notwithstanding her tub-like model and the inefficiency of her engine, Captain Carlin, commanding a blockade-runner5 took charge of her in an attack against the torpedoes of one hundred pounds each. The lateral spars suggested by you, Captain Carlin declined to use, as they would interfere very seriously with the movements attack was very dark, and the New Ironsides was not seen until quite near. Captain Carlin immediately made for her; but her side being oblique to the direction of hind some delay occurred before it was pried off. During this critical period Captain Carlin, in answer to threats and inquiries, declared his boat to be the Live Yankewith dispatches for the admiral. This deception was not discovered until after Carlin had backed out and his vessel was lost in the darkness. Shortly after this bold attempt of Captain Carlin, in the summer of 1863, to blow up the New Ironsides, Mr. Theodore Stoney, Dr. Ravenel, and other gentlemen of Charleston, had built a
ank of Captain. These appointments were made at Gen. Wool's request, and the official notification from the War department instructs the aids to immediately report to him in person.--N. Y. Tribune, August 29. The funeral ceremonies and military display in honor of Gen. Lyon took place at St. Louis, Mo., to-day. The procession which escorted the remains to the railroad depot consisted of Gen. Fremont's body-guard, under Gen. Zagoni, Capt. Tillman's company of cavalry; a section of Capt. Carlin's battery; the First regiment of Missouri Volunteers, Col. Blair; Gen. Fremont and staff; a number of army and volunteer officers; city officials; prominent citizens; and the Third regiment of United States Reserve Corps, Col. McNeil, all under command of Brigadier-General Siegel. The streets through which the procession passed were thronged with spectators, and the flags throughout the city were draped in mourning.--Louisville Journal, August 29. The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle and Sen
, in Missouri. Though the Union troops fought bravely for a while, they were surrounded and.compelled to surrender. Their loss was one killed and six wounded; the rebel loss was five killed and four wounded. Immediately after the surrender, the Federal prisoners were sworn by Jeff. Thompson not to bear arms against the Southern Confederacy, and released. The rebels then burned the bridge and retreated. All the troops along the road, when this became known, were ordered to Ironton, by Colonel Carlin, commandant of that post, in anticipation of an attack.--(Doc. 88.) About two o'clock A. M. a skirmish took place near Green River, Ky., between three hundred Confederate cavalry, and about forty United States cavalry, under the command of Capt. Vandyke. As many as forty or fifty shots were fired by the Confederates without effect. Only four or five were fired by the Union men. The latter kept their position, and sent for reinforcements, but before these arrived the rebels disappe
numbering one thousand and sixty muskets, left Albany, N. Y., for Washington. There was a perfect ovation at the departure of this regiment. Prior to their departure a handsome regimental banner was presented to the troops, with appropriate ceremonies, by the wife of Erastus Corning.--N. Y. Herald, Oct. 22. A large body of rebels, under Jeff. Thompson and Lowe, were defeated at Fredericktown, Missouri, by Illinois, Wisconsin, and Indiana troops, about two thousand in number, under Colonel Carlin, Colonel Ross, Colonel Baker, Major Plummer, and Major Scofield. The engagement lasted two hours, when the rebels fled from the field in disorder, and took to the woods. Major Gavitt and Captain Hingham were killed in making a charge. Colonel Lowe, the rebel leader, was killed and four heavy guns were captured. The rebels were pursued for twenty-two miles, when the chase was given over. Two hundred rebels were left in the field. Union loss, six killed and forty wounded.--(Doc. 100.
point them out.--Richmond Examiner, March 3. The rebels have established powder-mills in Virginia, South-Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, and have an abundance of powder, such as it is — a very weak article and deficient in power. As an evidence of this, it may be stated that many of the Federal soldiers wounded at Fort Donelson picked the buckshot out of their merely skindeep wounds without the assistance of surgeons.--St. Louis Daily News. Yesterday Lieut. Orlando Houston, of Capt. Carlin's Second Ohio battery, while on a foraging expedition ten miles west of Gen. Curtis's camp in Missouri, was attacked by three companies of Texas Rangers, and himself, eight men, and three horses captured. The balance of the Lieutenant's men retreated to camp, bringing in their wagons, forage, and a fine stallion which they captured. No lives were lost on the National side.--N. Y. Commercial, March 11. The Raleigh (N. C.) State Journal of this date, has the following: We have no mor
November 20. Colonel Carlin's expedition, which had been patrolling the country between Nashville and Clarksville, Tenn., returned to the former place this evening, having captured forty-three rebels, eighteen horses, twenty mules, and one hundred muskets.--Louisville Journal. Just before daybreak this morning a party of rebel cavalry made a sudden descent upon the National pickets stationed at Bull Run bridge, Va., and captured three of their number.--Both Warrenton and Leesburgh were occupied by rebel cavalry.
nt Md. V. I., Capt. Holton; battery D, First Virginia artillery, Capt. Carlin; company K, First Virginia cavalry, Lieut. Dawson; companies D arginia infantry, and Thirteenth Pennsylvania volunteer cavalry, and Carlin's battery, Brig.-Gen. Elliott commanding. A little to the west ary picket-line. The force above designated, except two sections of Carlin's battery stationed on the southern extremity of the ridge above der, of his staff, re ported to me at the place where two sections of Carlin's battery were in position, that he could find no enemy in his fronce of the enemy then in sight at two thousand. The two sections of Carlin's battery on the ridge as above stated commanded the position of th On Sunday morning General Elliott, with a portion of his brigade, Carlin's battery, and the Twelfth Virginia volunteer infantry, took positiand the Baltimore battery, Captain Alexander, at the star fort, and Carlin's battery, immediately south of the main fort, engaged the enemy's
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