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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 39 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 7 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 7 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Carlin or search for Carlin in all documents.

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ible to drive him from his works upon this part of the field. The attack was commenced by Schofield, who, with Newton, advanced gradually up to the enemy's work, Wood and Stanley pressing closely the extreme rebel right. Further to our right, Carlin's and King's brigades of Johnson's division assailed the enemy's lines in front of them with great vigor and determination. Never was field more stubbornly contested. Officers vied with the men in acts of daring. Judah's division, of Schofield; but not without the loss of many brave men. The heaviest fighting of the day was on the centre. Palmer's corps, on the right of Newton's division, had heavy skirmishing along the whole line, lasting from half-past 12 until one o'clock, when Carlin's brigade, of Johnson's division, advanced down a slope of a hill, and drove the enemy into their breastworks on the south side of a hill, rising out of the valley on the south. An assault on the breastworks was not ordered. The brigade at once
only five or six of whom were killed. Davis formed his line with the First division, Brigadier-General Carlin on the left, and the Second division, Brigadier-General Morgan, joining the Fifteenth co whom Colonel Lee, commanding the rebels, surrendered. The losses in the command are, about: Carlin's division, Moore's brigade, two hundred, including Major Carter, in hip; Captain Jenkins, thighthousand one hundred and twenty-five, a very small proportion of whom were killed. Morgan and Carlin handled their commands with consummate skill, and deserve to share with the brave fighter, Davishout a guard, not having men to spare, by my orders, and were taken up, I have been told, by General Carlin's brigade, which was undoubtedly credited with the number thus taken up. General Carlin's brGeneral Carlin's brigade, however, was not actually engaged, and did not, I am sure, capture a single prisoner. This assault was most successful and brilliant, and due credit should be given to whom it was mainly owing
o the crossroads near Cox's bridge across the Neuse. I had gone from General Slocum about six miles when I heard artillery in his direction, but was soon made easy by one of his staff officers overtaking me, explaining that his leading division (Carlin's) had encountered a division of rebel cavalry (Dibbrell's), which he was driving easily. But soon other staff officers came up, reporting that he had developed near Bentonville the whole of the rebel army under General Johnston himself. I sentits camp of March eighteenth, and first encountered Dibbrell's cavalry, but soon found his progress impeded by infantry and artillery. The enemy attacked his head of column, gaining a temporary advantage, and took three guns, and caissons of General Carlin's division, driving the two leading brigades back on the main body. As soon as General Slocum realized that he had in his front the whole Confederate army, he promptly deployed the two divisions of the Fourteenth corps, General Davis, and ra
, the following telegraphic despatch was received: St. Louis, November 2, 1861. To Brigadier-General Grant: Jeff. Thompson is at Indian ford of the St. Francis river, twenty-five miles below Greenville, with about three thousand men. Colonel Carlin has started with force from Pilot Knob. Send a force from Cape Girardeau and Bird's Point to assist Carlin in driving Thompson into Arkanas. By order of Major-General Fremont. Chauncey McKeever, Assistant Adjutant-General. The force Carlin in driving Thompson into Arkanas. By order of Major-General Fremont. Chauncey McKeever, Assistant Adjutant-General. The force I determined to send from Bird's Point were immediately designated, and Colonel R. J. Oglesby, Eighth Illinois volunteers, assigned to the command, under the following detailed instructions: headquarters District South-East Missouri, Cairo, November 8, 1861. Colonel R. J. Oglesby, commanding, &c., Bird's Point. Mo.: You will take command of an expedition consisting of your regiment, four companies of the Eleventh Illinois, all of the Eighteenth and Twenty-ninth, three companies of caval
akfast on the morning of the twenty-first, in and around Salem, the rebels made a fierce attack on the rear, with both musketry and shells. A brigade being sent back to assist in covering the retreat into the valley at the foot of the Catawba Mountain, the trains were hurried on. For a few moments it was very difficult to decide whether we were not going to have a regular stampede, such a panic seemed to possess the inevitable teamsters. The trains passed on in safety, and were followed by Carlin's and Stone's batteries, that by some strange neglect, were left unguarded by any except the artillerists, they having neither revolvers nor sabres. Passing into a defile, a party of one hundred and fifty to two hundred rebels rushed down on them, drove them off, and proceeded leisurely to chop up the spokes of the wheels and cut the traces, and lead off the horses, and all, too, without firing a single shot. So quietly was it all done, that persons accompanying the line, quietly resting i