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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 52 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 36 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 34 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 28 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Carlyle or search for Thomas Carlyle in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, IV (search)
an the wretched little squabbles of Mexico or South America. Letters, I., 373. And so those Americans who are spending their lives in the effort to remove the very defects visible in our letters, our arts, our literature, are met constantly by the insolent assumption, not that these drawbacks exist, but that they are not worth removing. How magnificent, for instance, is the work constantly done among us, by private and public munificence, in the support of our libraries and schools. Carlyle, in one of his early journals, deplores that while every village around him has its place to lock up criminals, not one has a public library. In the State of Massachusetts this condition of things is coming to be reversed, since many villages have no jail, and free libraries will soon be universal. The writer is at this moment one of the trustees of three admirable donations just given by a young man not thirty-five to the city of his birth,—a city hall, a public library, and a manual tra
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, VI (search)
n contemporaneous fame, then, the mere accident of nationality and language plays an enormous part; but this accident will clearly have nothing to do with the judgment of posterity. If any foreign country could stand for a contemporaneous posterity, one would think it might be a younger nation judging an older one. Yet how little did the American reputations of fifty years ago afford any sure prediction of permanent fame in respect to English writers! True, we gave early recognition to Carlyle and Tennyson, but scarcely greater than to authors now faded or fading into obscurity,—Milnes (Lord Houghton), Sterling, Trench, Alford, and Bailey. No English poem, it was said, ever sold through so many American editions as Festus; nor was Tupper's Proverbial Philosophy far behind it. Translators and publishers quarrelled bitterly for the privilege of translating Frederika Bremer's novels; but our young people, who already stand for posterity, hardly recall her name. I asked a Swedish
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XXIII (search)
e best by seeing in how few lines he can put vividly before us some theme which Tennyson or Browning afterward hammers out into a long poem. In English literature there seemed to be developing, in the time of Addison, something of that steady, even, felicitous power which makes French prose so remarkable; but it has passed, since his day, possibly from excess of vigor, into a prolonged series of experiments. Johnson experimentalized in one direction, Coleridge in another; Landor, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, in other directions still; and the net result is an uncertain type of style, which has almost always vigor and sometimes beauty, but is liable at any moment to relapse into Rider Haggard and a fiddlestick's end. It is hard for our modest American speech to hold its own, now that the potent influence of Emerson has passed away; but we are lost unless we keep resolutely in mind that prose style ought not to be merely a bludgeon or a boomerang, but should be a weapon of precision.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XXV (search)
ay one rarely finds among Germans or Frenchmen. It comes, perhaps, from the habit of local self-government. If the streets are not well lighted, or if one's horse stumbles over an ill-kept pavement, the natural impulse is to complain of it to every one we meet, and to write about it in the local newspaper. Instead of putting only our strong points forward, we are always ready to discuss our weakest side. This must always be remembered in digesting the criticisms of Englishmen. Dickens, Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, have said nothing about Americans more unpleasant than they had previously said about their own countrymen; and why should we expect to fare any better? It is only in foreign countries that even we Americans stand up resolutely for our own land. I lived for some time with a returned fellow-countryman of very keen wit, who, after long residence in Europe, found nothing to please him at home. One day, meeting one of his European companions, I was asked, How is ——? Does he
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
's day, 62. Boyesen, H. H., 144, 171. Bremer, Fredrika, 57. Bridaine, Jacques, 215. Brougham, Henry, 224. Brown, Charles Brockden, 51. Brown, John, 16, 155. Brown, J. Brownlee, 104. Browning, Robert, 25, 54, 55, 98, 196. Bryant, W. C., 100, 147. Bryce, James, 120, 167, 211. Bulwer, see Lytton. Buntline, Ned, 199, 200. Burroughs, John, 114. Burton, Robert, 114. Byron, Lord, 178, 195, 217. C. Cable, G. W., 11, 67. Cabot, J. E., 175. Calderon, Serafin, 229, 232. Carlyle, Thomas, 37, 56, 197, 206, 217. Casanova, Jacques, 41. Catullus, 99. Cervantes, Miguel de, 229. Champlain, Samuel de, 192. Channing, E. T., 94 Channing, Walter, 214. Channing, W. E., 46, 66, 155. Channing, W. E. (of Concord), 103. Chaucer, Geoffrey, 179. Cherbuliez, Victor, 79. Chapelain, J., 91. Chaplin, H. W., 76. Chicago Anarchists, the, 68. Choate, Rufus, 213. Cicero, M. T., 4, 13,16, 171. City life, limitations of, 80. Claverhouse, Earl of, 47. Clemens, S. H.,