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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 52 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 36 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 34 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 28 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Carlyle or search for Thomas Carlyle in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Shall Cromwell have a statue? (search)
an. Whom do you wish us to resemble? Him you set on a high column, that all men, looking on it, may be continually apprised of the duty you expect from them. Thomas Carlyle, Latter-day Pamphlets. 1850 At about 3 o'clock of the afternoon of September 3, 1658, the day of Worcester and of Dunbar, and as a great tempest was wearid events of the commonwealth. I propose on this occasion to do so; and reverting to my text— Shall Cromwell have a Statue—and reading that text in the gloss of Carlyle's Latter-Day Pamphlet utterance, I quote you Horace's familiar precept, Mutato nomine, de te Fabula narratur, and ask abruptly, Shall Robert E. Lee have a statuep what we know as character—just so long will that type of man be held in affectionate, reverential memory. They have in them all the elements of the heroic. As Carlyle wrote more than half a century ago, so now: Whom do you wish to resemble? Him you set on a high column. Who is to have a statue? means, whom shall we consecra<