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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 76 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for E. A. Carman or search for E. A. Carman in all documents.

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Great credit is due General Geary, Colonels Robinson, Dustin, and Carman, the officers commanding the several expeditions, also to Colonel Gal escorts; Brigadier-General Geary, Colonels Robinson, Dustin, and Carman, and to Colonel Garrard, commanding cavalry brigade, who went out w in front of our lines, without inflicting a single casualty on us. Carman's brigade of First division was sent out in the hope of interceptinmanding. The brigades commanded respectively by Colonels Selfridge, Carman, and Robinson. Second division, Brigadier-General J. W. Geary cocamp. On the following morning, (twenty-sixth,) two regiments of Carman's brigade, Jackson's division, drove away the rebel cavalry, and thom Geary's division occupied the upper end of Hutchinson's Island. Carman's brigade, First division, was sent to Argyle Island, and subsequenorks and gunboats was unusually heavy and continuous. Reports from Carman's brigade indicated that large columns were crossing to the Carolin
First division, Brigadier-General A. J. Jackson commanding. The brigades commanded respectively by Colonels Selfridge, Carman, and Robinson. Second division, Brigadier-General J. W. Geary commanding. Three brigades, commanded by Colonels PardeeColonel Robinson's brigade just as we were going into camp. On the following morning, (twenty-sixth,) two regiments of Carman's brigade, Jackson's division, drove away the rebel cavalry, and the corps moved rapidly into Sandersville, entering simuill, to cover the roads in our rear. Two regiments from Geary's division occupied the upper end of Hutchinson's Island. Carman's brigade, First division, was sent to Argyle Island, and subsequently across to the Carolina shore, with a section of ba the day of the twentieth, the fire from the enemy's works and gunboats was unusually heavy and continuous. Reports from Carman's brigade indicated that large columns were crossing to the Carolina shore, either to cover their only line of communicat
enemy in front, I sent the Second brigade (Colonel Carman commanding) to the right of the road, withing to the nature of the ground — a rice-swamp-Carman's brigade was unable to reach the desired posiont of my line, consisting of two regiments of Carman's brigade, under command of Colonel Cogswell, from headquarters of the corps, I directed Colonel Carman to move the remaining regiments of his briorce of which still remained in his front, Colonel Carman was unable to cross his entire brigade to , on the tenth of December a foraging party of Carman's brigade, commanded by Captain Gildersleeve, this brigade was ordered to the support of Colonel Carman's brigade of the First division, then prepde, First division, Twentieth army corps, (Colonel Carman,) connecting on the right with the First b soon driven. Our brigade sent to support Colonel Carman's brigade, of First division. The enemy rr for the third night. Just at this time, Colonel Carman, with his brigade, reported, with communic[14 more...]
crossed the river to Argyle Island, and exchanged a few shots with a section of the enemy's on the Carolina shore. During the night of the nineteenth, this section crossed to the Carolina shore with a brigade of infantry, under command of Colonel Carman. A few rounds were fired at small bodies of the enemy during the twentieth. About three P. M., a gunboat came up from the city, and opened on the right of this force on the Carolina shore. Captain Sloan was directed to open on her fromLieutenant Shepperd a battery of six thirty-pounder Parrott guns, needing him to see that works were built prepatory to moving the light battery in front of the enemy's works on Augusta road. During the night Lieutenant Freeman was ordered by Colonel Carman, commanding brigade, First division, Twentieth corps, to cross the river to the South-Carolina shore and report to Colonel Cogswell, commanding Second Massachusetts infantry. Went into position, built works, which were completed late in the
h that corps, and marching in its rear, until the afternoon of the twenty-first November, at five o'clock, when, at Eatonton Mills, Georgia, I left it, and joined the Twentieth corps, at Milledgeville, Georgia, at eleven o'clock A. M., November twenty-three, and then, pursuant to orders from Brigadier-General A. S. Williams, commanding Twentieth corps, I directed the different regiments of my command to report to their respective brigades, and assuming command of my own regiment, Second Massachusetts infantry, reported to my own brigade, Colonel E. A. Carman, commanding. In closing this report, I desire to express my thanks to the officers and men of the different regiments of the command, as well as of the different departments of the post, for their earnest and efficient cooperation in the performance of the new, various, and arduous duties of the post of Atlanta. I am, Colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, William Cogswell, Colonel Second Massachusetts Infantry.
iver through the city of Atlanta, and camped on the north side of the Decatur road at the rebel works. September twelfth, moved camp to the north side of the city. September seventeenth, division reviewed by General Williams. September nineteenth, division reviewed by General Slocum. October twentieth, Colonel James L. Selfridge took command of the First brigade. October twenty-first, moved out the Decatur road on a foraging expedition under command of Colonel. October twenty-third, Colonel Carman came out with Second brigade to support us, and took command; arrived in camp October twenty-sixth at four P. M. Brought in some eight hundred wagons loaded with corn. October twenty-eighth, 1864, moved out to Decatur to support a forage party, returned the same night. November fifth, moved out the McDonough road three miles, camped for the night. Some little picket-firing took place during the night. Returned to our old camp on the sixth. November eleventh, an election was held in t
to send him any reinforcements I might have and could spare. General Greene at this time was gallantly holding a portion of the woods to the left, the right of which was occupied by the enemy in force. I directed the Thirteenth New-Jersey, Colonel Carman, to support him. This regiment — also for the first time this day under fire — moved coolly and in an orderly manner toward General Greene's position; and I am much gratified to report that the General has spoken to me of their conduct in terhis battle — I believe unparalleled in the war in severity and duration — officers and men behaved with most praiseworth intrepidity and coolness. The One Hundred and Seventh New-York, Colonel Van Valkenburg, and the Thirteenth New-Jersey, Colonel Carman, being new troops, might well stand appalled at such exposure, but they did not flinch in the discharge of their duties. I have no words but those of praise for their conduct. They fought like veterans, and stood shoulder to shoulder with