hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Carondelet or search for Carondelet in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 1 document section:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Confederate States Navy. (search)
night one of the enemy's gun-boats ran the batteries at No. 10. She was a tin-clad called the Carondelet, and mounted 13 guns. For a few days she remained under the guns at New Madrid; but perceivinain. Commodore Hollins declined to comply with the request of the general, saying that as the Carondelet was iron-clad, and his fleet were all wooden boats, he did not think he could successfully com mounted together 17 guns, 8 and 9-inch smooth bores, 6 and 7-inch rifles. That same gun-boat Carondelet was afterwards engaged in the Yazoo river by the Arkansas, under the heroic I. N. Brown, and after an action of twenty minutes (the Arkansas, using only her two bow guns, 8-inch), the Carondelet was driven ashore riddled, disabled and colors down. Pope's army having been safely crossed by the Carondelet, moved on the rear of No. 10, and in a few days that place with all its fine ordnance and several thousand men surrendered to the enemy. Our fleet steamed down the river, and anchored und