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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Carondelet or search for Carondelet in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Recollections of Foote and the gun-boats. (search)
iting him in his room at the Planter's House in St. Louis, a day or two after the battle of Belmont, when he was suffering very severely from one of these attacks, which lasted two days. He was one of the most fascinating men in company that I have ever met, being full of anecdote, and having a graceful, easy flow of language. He was likewise, ordinarily, one of the most amiable-looking of men; but when angered, as I Rear-Admiral Henry Walke, commander of the Tyler, and afterward of the Carondelet. from a photograph. once saw him, his face impressed me as being most savage and demoniacal, and I can imagine that at the head of a column or in an attack he would have been invincible. Some idea of the moral influence that he possessed over men may be gained from the fact that, long before the war, when commanding the United States fleet of three vessels in Chinese waters, he converted every officer and man in the fleet to the principles of temperance, and had every one of them sign th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
lotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. Henry Walke, Rear-Admiral, U. S. N. The Carondelet fighting Fort Donelson, February 13, 1862. from a sketch by rear-admiral Walke. On the 7th of February, the day afnce with General Grant's request, and bombarded the fort until dusk, when nearly all Explosion of a gun on board the Carondelet during the attack on Fort Donelson. After a sketch by rear-admiral Walke. our 10-inch and 15-inch shells were expendeir batteries and compelled to seek refuge in caves and other places of safety. But it was very evident that the The Carondelet running the confederate batteries at Island number10 (April 4, 1862). after a sketch by rear-admiral Walke. great objecall, who ten days before the surrender had succeeded General John P. McCown in the command at Madrid Bend), over The Carondelet and Pittsburgh capturing the Confederate batteries below New Madrid. After a drawing by rear-admiral Walke. 5000 men,