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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Carondelet or search for Carondelet in all documents.

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estate bred mulattoes, and went down to the Mississippi in a dug-out to finish his education with professional river men, became a high-toned member of the chivalry, and lost his real-estate and contrabands at faro. Mrs. Stowe little thought, when she wrote her novel, that the Shelby Plantation would one day echo with cannon and musketry in a war growing out of the institution she wrote to abolish. Yet so it happened, last week. The expedition consisted of the Louisville, Mound City, Carondelet, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh, iron-clad turtles; four mortar-boats, the ram Price, and mosquito Linden, and the infantry of the Second division of the Fifteenth army corps, Gen. David Stuart's, except the Fifty-fifth Illinois, and a section of Wood's battery, Lieut. Mc<*>agg; the transports Silver Wave, Diligent, Eagle, Champion, Pocahontas, and Monongahela. Going up the Yazoo River seven miles, thence up Steele's Bayou twelve miles, the fleet came to Muddy Bayou, which runs across from
some of very heavy guns) are placed at the distance of a quarter of a mile apart, on high points, and completely command the river. I ordered the Louisville, Carondelet, Mound City, and Pittsburgh, to lead the way and attack the lower batteries, while the Tuscumbia, Benton, and Lafayette, attacked the upper ones; the Lafayette yed attack upon Grand Gulf by our naval flotilla commenced at eight o'clock this morning, all seven of the gunboats — Benton, (flag-ship,) Lafayette, Tuscumbia, Carondelet, Mound City, Pittsburgh, and Louisville — participating, and the fight continued until near one o'clock P. M., lasting almost five hours. The place was, very prwn empty. All the gunboats have received some injury, but not one has been materially damaged or crippled. The Lafayette, Tuscumbia, Pittsburgh, Mound City, Carondelet, Louisville — all went in and fought the rebel batteries, head, stern, and broadside; first down-stream, then up-stream; then enfilading them in the still basin<
Doc. 184.-capture of Grand Gulf, Mississippi. Admiral D. D. Porter's report. flag-ship Benton, Grand Gulf, Miss., May 3, 1863. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: I have the honor to report, that I got under way this morning with the Lafayette, Carondelet, Mound City, and Pittsburgh, and proceeded up to the forts at Grand Gulf for the purpose of attacking them again, if they had not been abandoned. The enemy had left before we got up, blowing up their ammunition, spiking their large guns, and burying or taking away the lighter ones. The armament consisted of thirteen guns in all. The works are of the most extensive kind, and would seem to defy the efforts of a much heavier fleet than the one which silenced them. The forts were literally torn to pieces by the accuracy of our fire. Colonel Wade, the commandant of the batteries, was killed, also his chief of staff. Eleven men were killed that we know of, and our informant says that many were wounded, and th
garrison. I kept six mortars playing rapidly on the works and town all night, and sent the Benton, and Mound City, and Carondelet, up to shell the water-batteries, and other places where troops might be resting during the night. At seven o'clock made an attack on the hill batteries opposite the canal. At eight o'clock I joined her with the Benton, Tuscumbia, and Carondelet. All these vessels opened on the hill batteries, and finally silenced them, though the main work on the battery contairifled gun was done by the Mound City, Lieutenant Commanding Byron Wilson. I then pushed the Benton, Mound City, and Carondelet up to the water-batteries, leaving the Tuscumbia (which is still out of repair) to keep the hill batteries from firing ece to fire on General McArthur's troops, which had landed a short time before at Warrenton. I sent the Mound City and Carondelet to drive him off, which they did in a few moments. I beg leave to inclose a letter from General McArthur, explaining