hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Carondelet or search for Carondelet in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 3 document sections:

James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
The General Price --a Confederate war-boat that changed hands This was one of the fourteen river-steamers condemned and seized for the Confederate Government by General Lovell at New Orleans, January 15, 1862. Converted into a war-boat, she took a bold part in the engagement near Fort Pillow, which resulted in the sinking of the Cincinnati. She arrived on the scene just as the General Bragg was disabled and boldly rammed the Federal gunboat for the second time, when a shot from the Carondelet disabled her. In the engagement with the Ellet rams off Memphis, she met the same fate as the General Bragg and the other vessels. She and the General Beauregard, while making a dash from opposite sides upon the Monarch, both missed that speedy vessel and collided with each other. The General Price was so badly injured that her captain ran her upon the Arkansas shore, to be added to the prizes won by the Ellet rams. The action put an end to the river-defense flotilla of the Confederates
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
s pierced her below the guards. She began shipping water so fast that it was feared that she would sink. In turning around to get out of range, she fouled the Carondelet's stern, breaking one of her rudders. In going ahead to clear the Carondelet from the Pittsburg, Commander Walke was forced to approach within 350 yards of theCarondelet from the Pittsburg, Commander Walke was forced to approach within 350 yards of the fort, which immediately concentrated the fire of the batteries upon that single vessel, whose consorts were all drifting out of action in a disabled condition. It was only by great coolness and courage that the Carondelet was extricated after being exposed to a terrific fire for some time. The Pittsburg was conspicuous in the fCarondelet was extricated after being exposed to a terrific fire for some time. The Pittsburg was conspicuous in the fight with the Confederate flotilla at Fort Pillow. She was sent by Admiral Porter on the famous land cruise up the Yazoo, which nearly cost him the flotilla. She ran the batteries at Vicksburg and helped to silence the batteries at Grand Gulf, Mississippi. In May, 1863, she was with Admiral Porter on the first Red River expedit
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), On the Mississippi and adjacent waters (search)
brigade. The navy's fresh-water sailors In this group the crew of the Carondelet is crowding to get within range of the camera. One of the earliest of the river ironclads, the Carondelet was frequently the flagship of Admiral Porter; and her crew, at first recruited from among men who had had little experience afloat, soo in 1861 and early in 1862, there came into being the famous fighters, Cairo, Carondelet, Cincinnati, Louisville, Mound City, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis. To these were, where Flag-Officer Foote's flotilla consisted of the Cincinnati (flagship), Carondelet, St. Louis, and Essex, to which formidable force were added the three small w the keels of three of the series of the Eads ironclads, and here the unlucky Carondelet was repaired after her injuries at Fort Donelson. The large force of shipwriexpedition was sent up to search for her on the 15th of July, composed of the Carondelet, Tyler, and the ram Queen of the West. The results, to put it briefly, were a