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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 23, 1860., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Paroles of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
rker, Maj. Artillery C. S. A., two horses. H. V. Gray, Surgeon C. S. A., one horse. L. F. Dozier, Asst. Surgeon C. S. A., one horse. Jesse S. Wood, Capt. and Asst. Qr. Ma., two horses. Jas. F. Grattan, 1st Lieut. and Adj't., one horse. Jno. H. Weddel, 1st Lt Commanding Taylor Battery, one horse. Jno. T. Ford, 2d Lt. Artillery, C. S. A., one horse. John Donnell Smith, Capt. Commanding Battery A, one horse. J. R. Shumman, 1st Lieut. Artillery, C. S. A., one horse. D. J. Carr, 2nd Lieut. Artillery, C. S. A., one horse. H. A. Wise, 2d Lieut. Artillery, C. S A., one horse. C. A. Bower, 2nd Lieut. Artillery, one horse. Geo. Poindexter, 1st Lieut. Commanding Battery B, two horses. Thos. H. Mercer, 2d Lieut. C. S. A., one horse. M. M. Rasen, 2d Lieut. C. S. A., one horse. E. L. Purse, 2d Lieut. Commanding Battery F, one horse. Jas. Woolfolk, 1st Lieut. Commanding Battery C, two horses. Geo. D. Vaughan, Jr. 1st Lt. C. S. A., one horse. E. J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
2. Campbell, C. H., XXVI. Campbell, Maj. J. G., 230. Campbell, Lt. W. E., 122. Campbell, W. M., 18. Campbell, Capt. W. W., 402. Cannady, Ass't Surg. J. G., 275. Cannon, Lt. D. C., 450. Cannon, Ass't Surg. J. L., 85. Cannon, Capt. W. J., 313. Canty, Capt. B. M., 123. Capehart, Surg. W. R., 15, 64. Capers, Lt. J. H., 449. Carlisle, Capt., Jno. N., 368. Carlton's Battery, 44. Carmical, Col., Geo. H., 195. Caroline Light Art, 26, 27. Carpenter's Battery, 28. Carr, Lt. D. J., 13, 49. Carr, Capt. N. C., 394. Carr, Capt. W. C. N., 72. Carraway, Maj. D. T., 358. Carrington, Surg. Geo W., 254. Carson, Capt. J. W., 448. Carson, Chaplain W. B., 368. Carter's Battery, 24. Carter, Lt. Henry C., 16. Carter, Lt. J. D, 334. Carter, Lt. J. L., 109. Carter, J. M., 18. Carter, Lt. L. H., 333. Carter, Maj. R. H., 3. Carter, Col., Thos. H., 16, 21, 22; headquarters of, 21. Carter, Surg., W. Gibbon, 72. Carter, Lt. W. J., 72. Cary, Maj. G. W., 145
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Present: (search)
ever the restless and inveterate opposers of the Union? I proceed, by your leave, to state as a fact which shines forth in cloudless evidence, that the Southern Colonies were the foremost to nurse the earliest hope of Colonial alliance, and when troubles increased, when Franklin's Confederacy (limited) had been ditched in the sectional mire, when patriots were trying to devise nearer and broader relations—the first practical step toward our present organized American Union was taken when Dabney Carr, in 1773, proposed in the Legislature of Virginia to provide a plan of concerted action, and the State having adopted the first scheme of inter-Colonial correspondence, as a great Northern historian justly says, laid down the foundation of the Union. A crisis was reached in 1774, upon the passage by Parliament of the bill to close the port of Boston, but this attempt to coerce a sister Colony by armed invasion fired the Southern heart, and then the fraternal cry that the cause of Massach
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Judge William Brockenbrough. (search)
Mr. Watts, Judge Ro. B. Taylor. On the second ballot, Taylor was dropped. Then Judge Brockenbrough got seventy-two votes, and from both houses ninety-three to Stanard's sixty-four, and was promoted to the Supreme Court of Appeals. The cases in which he sat are reported in Leigh's Reports, Vols. V to IX, inclusive, and they contain a good many of his opinions. The Court of Appeals at that time consisted of President Henry St. George Tucker, and Judges Francis T. Brooke, Wm. H. Cabell, Dabney Carr, and Brockenbrough. Hon. John Randolph Tucker, who became so highly distinguished, describes them as he, when a boy, saw them sitting, in 1835, in the Senate chamber of the Capitol. In his reminiscences of the Virginia Bench and Bar, given to the Bar Association of Richmond, he says: And next to him I see the vigorous face, strongly marked with common sense and integrity, of William Brockenbrough, for many years an eminent judge on the circuit and of the general court, and then a judge
S. Adams in Boston Gazette of 31 Dec. 1770. and being resolved to brave the citizens on Monday night, S. Adams, in Boston Gazette, 24 Dec. 1770. they forewarned their particular acquaintance not to be abroad. Without duly restraining his men, Carr, the Lieutenant Colonel of the twenty-ninth, made complaint to the Lieutenant Governor of the insult they had received. Hutchinson's Hist. III. 270, 271. The Council, deliberating on Monday, seemed of opinion, that the town would never be them. Quincy of Braintree, on behalf of the Justices, pointed out the danger of the most terrible consequences. I have no power to remove the troops, said Hutchinson, nor to direct where they shall be placed; but he sent to invite Dalrymple and Carr, the Commanding Officers, to be present in Council. They attended, and the subject was largely discussed. At eleven, the Town Meeting was opened in Faneuil Hall by prayer from Cooper; then Samuel Adams and fourteen others, among them, Hancock
n January to the speech of Hutchinson. They formed themselves, therefore, into a Committee of the whole House on the state of the Colony; and in that Committee Dabney Carr, of Charlotte, a young statesman of brilliant genius as well as of fervid patriotism, moved a series of resolutions for a system of intercolonial Committees ofrch, the Resolutions were reported to the House, and unanimously adopted. They appointed their Committee on which appear the names of Bland and Lee, of Henry, and Carr, and Jefferson. Their Resolves were sent to every Colony, with a request that each would appoint its Committee to communicate from time to time with that of Virgid a Province; Virginia promoted a confederacy. Were the several Committees but to come together, the world would see an American Congress. The associates of Dabney Carr were spared for still further service to humanity. He himself was cut down in his prime; and passed away like a shadow; but the name of him, who at this moment
. --The annual deer hunt came off at Crawford's Springs last week. There were thirty gentlemen in the company and thirty dogs. In five days twenty-nine deer were shot, and twenty-two cut up for distribution. The old Nimrod of hunters, Mr. Dabney Carr, of this county — now, we believe, in the eighty-sixth year of his age--killed one of the largest and fattest of the bucks, and his servant man, accompanying him, killed another. Mr. Carr is stout and athletic, stands erect and walks with for distribution. The old Nimrod of hunters, Mr. Dabney Carr, of this county — now, we believe, in the eighty-sixth year of his age--killed one of the largest and fattest of the bucks, and his servant man, accompanying him, killed another. Mr. Carr is stout and athletic, stands erect and walks with firmness and vigor. He looks likely to survive many more annual deer hunts. Mr. War wick Woods killed three deer on the first day, and others killed one such.--Charlottesville (Va.) Jeffersonia