hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 20 results in 5 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, State of (search)
tinued. Henry T. Clarkeacting1861 Zebulon B. Vanceassumes officeNov. 17, 1862 William W. Holdenprovisional governorJune 12, 1865 Jonathan Worthassumes officeDec. 15, 1865 William W. Holdenassumes officeJuly 4, 1868 Tod R. Caldwellassumes office1872 Curtis H. BrogdenactingJuly 17, 1874 Zebulon B. Vanceassumes office1877 Thomas J. Jarvisassumes officeJan. 18, 1881 Alfred M. Scalesassumes officeJan. 1885 Daniel G. Fowleassumes officeJan. 1889 Thomas M. Holtassumes officeJan. 1891 Elias Carrassumes officeJan. 1893 Daniel L. Russellassumes officeJan. 1, 1897 C. B. Aycockassumes officeJan. 1, 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. Benjamin Hawkins1st to 3d1789 to 1795 Samuel Johnston1st to 2d1789 to 1793 Alexander Martin3d to 6th1793 to 1799 Timothy Bloodworth4th to 7th1795 to 1801 Jesse Franklin6th to 9th1799 to 1805 David Stone7th to 9th1801 to 1807 James Turner9th to 14th1805 to 1816 Jesse Franklin10th to 13th1807 to 1813 David Stone13th to 14
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pea Ridge, battle of. (search)
under Gen. J. C. Davis, and composed the centre, and the 4th, on the right, was commanded by Colonel Carr. His line of battle extended about 4 miles, and there was only a broad ravine between his trana infantry, attacked a portion of Van Dorn's troops before he was fairly ready for battle. Colonel Carr went to the assistance of Weston, and a severe engagement ensued. Thus the battle near Pea Rs, and Sigel with his heavy guns, Map of battle of Pea Ridge. now went to the assistance of Colonel Carr on the right. But Carr had held his ground. There were no indications that the ConfederatesCarr had held his ground. There were no indications that the Confederates wished to renew the fight, for it was now sunset. The Nationals bivouacked on the battle-field that night among the dead and dying. The contest was renewed at dawn (March 8), when the Nationals wildest confusion. Van Dorn, who had been a greater part of the day with the troops that fought Carr, concentrated his whole available force on Curtis's right. The latter had been vigilant, and at
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Port Gibson, battle of. (search)
d transports which had run by Grand Gulf in 1863. His troops consisted chiefly of General McClernand's 13th Army Corps. These troops pushed forward and were met (May 1), 8 miles from Bruinsburg, by a Confederate force, which was pushed back to a point 4 miles from Port Gibson. There McClernand was confronted by a strong force from Vicksburg, under General Bowen, advantageously posted. The Nationals were divided for the occasion. On McClernand's right were the divisions of Generals Hovey, Carr, and Smith, and on his left that of Osterhaus. The former pressed the Confederates steadily back to Port Gibson. The troops of Osterhaus were reinforced by a brigade of General Logan's division of the advance of McPherson's corps, and others were sent to help McClernand. Late in the afternoon the Confederates were repulsed and pursued to Port Gibson. Night ended the conflict, and under its cover the Confederates fled across a bayou, burning the bridges behind them, and retreated towards
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
en commanding in the department of Virginia. They were commanded by Brigadier-General E. W. Pierce, and were about thirty-five hundred strong, consisting of eight hundred and fifty men of the Fifth New York Volunteers, under Colonel Duryea; six hundred and fifty of the Third New York, under Colonel Townsend; seven hundred and fifty from the Seventh New York, Fourth Massachusetts, and First Vermont, under Colonel Bendix, of the Seventh New York, with others from the Second New York, under Colonel Carr, and from the First New York, under Colonel Allen, with a detachment from the Second United States Artillery with several pieces. The Federals attacked gallantly, but after a fight of two hours and a half were defeated, having lost eighteen killed, fifty-three wounded and five missing. The Confederates lost one killed and eleven wounded. This death happened towards the close of the action. A strong column of Federals, consisting of Massachusetts troops, under the leadership of Major T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
r celebration of the one hundred and seventeenth anniversary of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. The resolution was adopted unanimously. Then Senator Ransom offered a resolution of thanks to Senator Gray, which was adopted. Elias Carr, the Democratic nominee for Governor, was introduced. There were loud cries for Gray, then for Carr, and then for Ransom, but none of them responded, and after giving three cheers for Senator Hill the meeting broke up. Senator Hill held an infCarr, and then for Ransom, but none of them responded, and after giving three cheers for Senator Hill the meeting broke up. Senator Hill held an informal reception on the platform, and then returned to his hotel. Dinner was served at 4 o'clock. At 6.30 o'clock Senator Hill, Senator Gray, General Lathrop and the United Press correspondent left Charlotte on the special car Neva for the North. The day observed in Raleigh. All the State departments and the banks of the city were closed to-day, being State holiday, in honor of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. Governor Holt, who was to have been present at Charlotte to-day on t