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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Harper's Ferry and first Manassas. (search)
, we scrambled down the mountain and returned to our barracks, very much wearied, after first reporting ourselves at the General's Headquarters, where an amusing little scene took place between the Acting Inspector-General, who found fault with the way in which one of the men ordered arms, and one of our lieutenants, who informed him that the company had had a drill-master. The next day we learnt that the Governor had ordered the Charlottesville Battalion, as our four companies under Captain George Carr (formerly of the U. S. Army) were called, to return home, and that evening we left for Winchester, where we remained all night, and went to Strasburg the next morning in wagons provided for our accommodation. I think we were rather glad on the whole that we were leaving the Ferry, though our military ardor was not quite cooled down by our short, but arduous campaign. We saw a little service, at all events, having been ordered out twice, in the morning and at night (and the night ma
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Zzz Missing head (search)
d, and about half as many Irish. The owning of a black or white slave, or servant, at this period was regarded as an evidence of dignity and respectability; and hence magistrates and clergymen winked at the violation of the law by the mercenary traders, and supplied themselves without scruple. Indian slaves were common, and are named in old wills, deeds, and inventories, with horses, cows, and household furniture. As early as the year 1649 we find William Hilton, of Newbury, sells to George Carr, for one quarter part of a vessel, James, my Indian, with all the interest I have in him, to be his servant forever. Some were taken in the Narragansett war and other Indian wars; others were brought from South Carolina and the Spanish Main. It is an instructive fact, as illustrating the retributive dealings of Providence, that the direst affliction of the Massachusetts Colony—the witchcraft terror of 1692—originated with the Indian Tituba, a slave in the family of the minister of Danve
hos. J. Kirkpatrick, Wm. H. Hall. H. F. Bocock. Blacksburg. Jas. R. Kent, Jas. N. Otey, W. R. Perfator, Geo. R. Evans. Henry Ribble, D. H. Hoge, Frs. Anderson. Alexandria. Wm. Gregory, C. F. Suttle, F. L. Smith, C. C. Smoot. Turner Dixon, J. M. Johnson, J. H. Brent. Winchester. Ro. L. Baker, Patrick Smith, Henry S, Baker. Jas. B. Taylor. H. H. McGuire, T. T. Fauntleroy, Jr., Robert Steele. Charlottesville. T. J. Randolph, George Carr, Socrates Maupin, Jas. Lobban. B. W. Snead, R. G. Crank, Wm. S. Dabney. Lewisburg. Samuel Price, Joel McPherson, Johnson E. Bell, Floyd Estell. R. B. Moorman, R. B. James, Austin Handley. Wytheville. Stephen McGavock, Ro. Crockett, Isaac J. Leftwich, Wm. Terry. A. T. Crockett, Gordon C. Kent. Wm. Gibboney. Bank of Virginia.Richmond. James Caskie, Archibald Thomas, William Gray, A. T. Harris, Thomas R. Price. R. Milton Cary,
The Daily Dispatch: October 11, 1861., [Electronic resource], Down the Rio Grande — the trip from Mesilla to Brownsville. (search)
sell them, and make report to the Court. Preceedings have been instituted in the Confederace States District Court at Richmond, for the sequestration of property belonging to alien enemies, amounting in value to over six hundred thousand dollars. To the list of parties representing this property, already published, we add the names of Jas. S. Woods and John Lowry, former partners of George W. Farant; Isaac M. Wolff and Henry Stern, former partners of Gave Elkers and Simon Elkers, and Geo. Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, agents for Commodore Uriah P. vy. Admiralty Proceedings. Hollins, Schooner Margaret, in Admiralty.--The Marshal made a report of the sale of the id Schooner Margaret, her tackle, apparel, furniture and cargo, pursuant to the vendi issued in this case, to which there is no exception, and which is confirmed by the Court, and the said Marshal paid into the registry of this Court the sum of $697.97, the t proceeds arising from the said sale; and it is ordered
Court. --We append a summary of the business transacted in this Court yesterday: Thomas C. Panamore was appointed Receiver for district No. 8, composed of the counties of Northampton and Accomac. Baldwin, a slave, the property of Gilbert B. Claiborne, indicted for misdemeanor, was arraigned and plead guilty on the fifth count of the indictment, and was remanded to the custody of the Marshal. Sentence to be pronounced hereafter. Confederate States vs. John H. Gilmer, on a summons issued against the defendant, requiring him to appear and answer interrogatories. Answer filed in writing. Confederate States vs. George Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, on a petition to sequester the estate of Uriah P. Levy, an alien enemy. The defendant, Joel N. Wheeler, appeared by Wm. Green, his attorney, and filed in writing his answer, and claim to the petition and interrogatories filed by the Receiver. This write is to sequester the estate formerly owned by President Jefferson.
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1864., [Electronic resource], Stop the Runaways.--one thousand dollars reward. (search)
Receiver's sale of Monticello and Buck Island Estates, and other valuable property. --In pursuance of a degree of the District Court of the Confederate States of America for the Eastern District of Virginia pronounced on the 27th of September, 1864, in the case of the Confederate States against George Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, I shall sell, on the 17th day of November, at public auction, on the premises, for cash, in Confederate Treasury notes of the new issue, the following real and personal estate, late the property of Captain U. P. Levy, deceased, an alien enemy: 1. Monticello, a tract of two hundred and eighteen acres of land, in the county of Albemarle, in the State of Virginia, about two miles from the town of Charlottesville, with all the buildings therein, consisting of a large and commodious brick dwelling-house, with a variety of out-buildings, planned and built by Mr. Jefferson, who owned it and resided there at the time of his death. 2. Buck Island, a tra
Receiver's sale of Monticello and Buck Island Estates, and other Valuable property. --In pursuance of a decree of the District Court of the Confederate States of America for the Eastern District of Virginia pronounced on the 27th day of September, 1864, in the case of the Confederate States against George Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, I shall sell, on the 17TH day of November, at public auction, on the premises, for cash, in Confederate Treasury notes of the new issue, the following real and personal estate, late the property of Captain U. P. Levy, deceased, an alien enemy: 1. Monticello, a tract of two hundred and eighteen acres of land, in the county of Albemarle, in the State of Virginia, about two miles from the town of Charlottesville, with all the buildings thereon, consisting of a large and commodious brick dwelling-house, with a variety of out-buildings, planned and built by Mr. Jefferson, who owned it and resided there at the time of his death. 2. Buck Island, a
Receiver's Sale of Monticello and Buck Island Estates, and other Valuable property. --In pursuance of a decree of the District Court of the Confederate States of America for the Eastern District of Virginia pronounced on the 27th day of September, 1864, in the case of the Confederate States against George Carr and Joel N. Wheeler, I shall sell, on the 17th day of November, at public auction, on the premises, for cash, in Confederate Treasury notes of the new issue, the following real and personal estate, late the property of Captain U. P. Levy, deceased, an alien enemy: 1. Monticello, a tract of two hundred and eighteen acres of land, in the county of Albemarle, in the State of Virginia, about two miles from the town of Charlottesville, with all the buildings thereon, consisting of a large and commodious brick dwelling-house, with a variety of out-buildings, planned and built by Mr. Jefferson, who owned it and resided there at the time of his death. 2. Buck Island, a