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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 6 0 Browse Search
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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
Humphreys, like a shot, to stop her. Seeing her going into a pine tree, he drove his horse between the tree and her; but, in so doing, encountered a hidden branch, which slapped the brisk old gent out of his saddle, like a shuttlecock! The Chief-of-Staff was up in a second, laughing at his mishap; while I galloped up, in serious alarm at his accident. To make short a long story, the persistent H. tagged after those womenfolk (and I tagged after him) first to Corps Headquarters, then to General Carr's Headquarters, and finally to General Morris's Headquarters, by which time it was dark! I was the only one that knew the nearest way home (we were four miles away) and didn't I lead the eminent soldier through runs and mud-holes, the which he do hate! To-day we have had a tremendous excitement: a detail of 250 men to police the camp, under charge of Biddle, just appointed Camp Commandant. They have been sweeping, cutting down stumps, burning brush, and, in general, making the worst-
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
of privates, all marching gaily along, unconscious, happily, of their fate. July 1, 1864 Nothing very new to-day. I took advantage of the propinquity of the nigger division (which had come to fill part of the 6th Corps' line, during its absence) to show the unbleached brethren to my Imperial commissioners. We rode first to General Ferrero's Headquarters. This officer, as his name hints, is an Italian by birth, his papa being of Milan. He is quite a well-looking man, and, like unto General Carr, was a dancing-master before he took to soldiering. He speaks Italian and some French and sputtered along very successfully with the visitors. There was turned out for them a regiment of darks. The sun was intense and the sable gents looked like millers, being indeed quite obscured except when they stood perfectly still. They did remarkably well, and the French officers, who were inclined to look favorably on them beforehand, were in ecstasies over their performances. July 4, 1864
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
rsburg, 164, 167, 168, 197; mine, 199, 200, 310. Bushwhacking, 295. Butler, Benjamin Franklin, 118; orders demonstration, 68; Petersburg and, 160; described, 192; Smith and, 192; visit to, 193, 204, 279; sharpshooters and, 205; Dutch Gap canal, 213, 282; stampeded, 237; cabinet rumor, 266; devices, 284. Cabot, Louis, 353. Cadwalader, Charles E., 69, 130, 210. Cadwalader, S., 359. Calling the hours, 276. Cameron, Simon, 317. Cannon, management of, 202; wooden, 242. Carr, Joseph Bradford, 67, 180. Carroll, Samuel Sprigg, 92, 139. Casey, Silas, 262. Castle-Cuffe, Viscount, see O'Connor. Cattle, stampede of, 275. Cavada, Adolph, 65, 210. Cavalry, southern, 125; boastfulness, 346. Chambliss, John Randolph, Jr., 216. Chanal, colonel de, 178, 179, 191, 193, 199; love of trees, 195. Chapin's farm, 233. Charles City, 156. Chesterfield station, 122. Chickahominy River, 157. Childer's house, 346. City Point, 163; explosion, 209. Civilians, visitin