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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 23 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 26 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 11 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Carroll or search for Carroll in all documents.

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ched Conrad's Store, only 15 miles distant, and whose advance of cavalry and artillery, under Col. Carroll, appeared that day. June 8. Carroll had been told that Jackson's train was parked nearCarroll had been told that Jackson's train was parked near Port Republic, with a drove of beef cattle; the whole guarded by some 200 or 300 cavalry; and he dashed into the village with his troopers and two guns, expecting to cross the bridge and make an eas But Jackson was already there, with 2 infantry brigades and 3 batteries; by the fire of which Carroll was driven out in 20 minutes, falling back two miles and a half, upon Gen. Tyler's brigade of iow to have retreated also ; instead of which, he sent his men to bivouac, and went forward with Carroll to reconnoiter. His vedettes, at 4 A. M., June 9. reported that there had been no advance ouns, which, with 67 prisoners, was brought off in our retreat, which was admirably covered by Col. Carroll. The Rebels pursued about 5 miles, capturing 450 prisoners and about 800 muskets. Disastrou
r, holding the foot of a mountain and covered by woods. The best blood of the Union was poured out like water, but in vain. Gen. Geary, who, with five Ohio regiments and the 28th Pennsylvania, made the most desperate charge of the day, was himself wounded, with most of his officers. Gen. Crawford's brigade came out of the fight a mere skeleton. The 109th Pennsylvania, 102d New York, and several other regiments, left half their number dead or wounded on that fatal field. Gens. Augur and Carroll were severely wounded; as were Cols. Donnelly, 46th Pa., Creighton, 7th Ohio, and Majors Savage, 2d Mass., Armstrong, 5th Ohio, and Pelouze, Banks's Adjutant. Gen. Prince was taken prisoner after dark, by accident, while passing from one part of his command to another. Our loss in killed and wounded could hardly have been less than 2,000 men. We were not so much beaten as fairly crowded off the field; where Jackson claims to have taken 400 prisoners, 1 gun, and 5,302 small arms, with a lo
hen the now united corps of Hill and Longstreet fell furiously upon our left and left center, pushing them back, and, striking heavily on Stevenson's division of Burnside's corps, drove it back and rushed through the gap. Hancock promptly sent Col. Carroll, with the 3d brigade of his 2d division, to strike the advancing foe in flank, which was admirably done: the enemy being driven back with heavy loss, and our troops regaining their former position. Thus ended the battle on our left; but, thism, but no one surrendered more for his country's sake, or gave his life more joyfully for her deliverance, than did James S. Wadsworth. Among our wounded in this contest were Gens. Hancock (slightly), Getty, Gregg, Owen, Bartlett, Webb, and Carroll. Of the Rebel killed, the most conspicuous were Maj.-Gen. Sam. Jones and Brig.-Gen. Albert G. Jenkins. Among their wounded were Gens. Longstreet (disabled for months), Stafford (mortally), Pickett, Pegram, and Hunter. Doubtless, their aggre
New Mexico, 21; at Fort Craig, 22-3; Valverde. 22; holds New Mexico, 25; in command of the trans-Mississippi department--Banks turns over his army to him, 551; aids in recovering Alabama, 716; advances against Mobile, 721; Dick Taylor surrenders to, 754. Cantwell, Col., Ohio, killed at Bull Run, 189. Carlin, Col., at Perryville, Ky., 220. Carney's bridge, La., encounter at, 328. Carr, Gen., at Pea Ridge, 28 to 31; attacks Shelby in Arkansas, and captures 200 prisoners, 554. Carroll, Gen., severely wounded, 177. Carter, Gen., wounded at Franklin, 683. Carter, Brig.-Gen. Il (Union), his raids into East Tennessee. 283. Carter, Gen. S. P., retreats across the Ohio, 427. Casey, Gen. Silas, his division surprised at Fair Oaks, 143 to 147: his camp captured. 148; commands a division at Malvern Hill, 165. Catlett's Station, Pope's headquarters surprised at, 178; Stuart surprises Warren at, 395. Cedar creek, Early surprises Crook at, 613; Sheridan triumphs a