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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 23 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 26 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 11 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Carroll or search for Carroll in all documents.

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s to the town, and from the engagement with Gen. Carroll that morning, had obtained the range of thef fifty thousand men. I at once sent for Col. Carroll, Lieut.-Colonel Shriber, Captains Clark andorcements of Generals Kimball and Ferry. Gen. Carroll took command of the covering of the retreat willing men never entered a battle-field. Gen. Carroll distinguished himself by his coolness and d The Fourth brigade, under the command of Col. Carroll of the Eighth Ohio regiment, was repulsed oiven to that effect. Upon that assumption, Col. Carroll, who had command of the advance, has been lnd three days. On Saturday, the seventh, Col. Carroll received orders to move forward to Waynesbot, six miles before reaching Port Republic, Col. Carroll sent forward a party of scouts, who returneso to do. Retiring from Port Republic, Colonel Carroll brought his force to a stand at the firstl Tyler says, among other like compliments: Col. Carroll distinguished himself by his coolness and d[13 more...]
ing upon her iron surface. At eleven o'clock A. M., one of the Patrick Henry's eight-inch solid shot passed into her bow port; immediately the smoke rushed out of her own ports, showing, evidently, that she was on fire. We gave her three hearty cheers as she slipped her cables and moved down the river. Our pickets heard her captain say to one of the other gunboats that she was in a sinking condition. Our sharp-shooters did good service, picking off every man who showed himself. There is no doubt we struck them a hard blow. The last that was seen of them they were steaming down the river. Every officer and man performed their duties with coolness and determination, and it would be doing injustice to many if I should mention or particularize any. Capt. Drury and his company fought their guns with great effect. casualties.--Seven killed, among them Midshipman Carroll, and eight wounded. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Eben Farrand, C. S.N., Commanding Post.
r baggage-trains were lost on either side, but the loss of life on both sides were severe. Brig.-Gens. Geary, Augur and Carroll were badly wounded, and Brig.-Gen. Prince was captured by accident. Very many of our best field and company officers we and his example went far to secure that gallant and noble conduct which has made his corps famous. Gens. Geary, Augur, Carroll, Gordon and Green behaved with distinguished gallantry. Gen. Prince, who had led his brigade throughout the action withy this tribute to the memory of one and to the rising fame of the other. Gens. Williams, Augur, Crawford, Green, Geary, Carroll, and Prince, of Banks's corps, have been already noticed for their gallant and distinguished conduct at Cedar Mountain. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. Special orders, no.--.headquarters army of Virginia, Centreville, Aug. 31, 1862. Carroll's brigade of Ricketts's division will proceed at once to Fairfax Station, and take post as a guard for commissary stores
r baggage-trains were lost on either side, but the loss of life on both sides were severe. Brig.-Gens. Geary, Augur and Carroll were badly wounded, and Brig.-Gen. Prince was captured by accident. Very many of our best field and company officers we and his example went far to secure that gallant and noble conduct which has made his corps famous. Gens. Geary, Augur, Carroll, Gordon and Green behaved with distinguished gallantry. Gen. Prince, who had led his brigade throughout the action withy this tribute to the memory of one and to the rising fame of the other. Gens. Williams, Augur, Crawford, Green, Geary, Carroll, and Prince, of Banks's corps, have been already noticed for their gallant and distinguished conduct at Cedar Mountain. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. Special orders, no.--.headquarters army of Virginia, Centreville, Aug. 31, 1862. Carroll's brigade of Ricketts's division will proceed at once to Fairfax Station, and take post as a guard for commissary stores