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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 23 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 26 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 11 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 3, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Carroll or search for Carroll in all documents.

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s battle he was elated from the very beginning, he knew that victory was certain, and his countenance gleamed with the enthusiasm of a great man, who was conscious that he was penieving a great success that was to carry his name down to the latest syllable of recorded time. His body was borne from the field by myself and three others of the staff. Breckinridge's reserve composed a division of seven or eight thousand men — his own brigade of gallant Kentuckian, and Crittenden's and Carroll's commands, who were placed under him a few days before the battle. All of our Generals were conspicuous for bravery and gallantry, but you must excuse a Kentuckian, who was an eye witness, for saying that Gen. Breckinridge's conduct on that day was perfectly glorious, equalling in every respect the daring of Mural, United with the coolness of Wellington. I was near Major Tom Hawkins, who was wounded in the chin by a grapes shot, and saw Col. Hodge dismounted by a Minnie ball pass