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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 81 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 7, 1863., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Charles Carroll or search for Charles Carroll in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
the Maryland Guard, acting under the orders of Governor Hicks. The governor was in Baltimore during the attack on the troops and was carried off his feet and out of his head by the furor of the hour. He gave the order to burn the bridges. He afterward strenuously denied giving it, but he gave it. On Sunday morning, April 21st, the Howard County Dragoons, Capt. George R. Earltree, came in, and by the boat two companies from Easton, and news came that the companies from Harford, Cecil, Carroll and Prince George's were on the march. Three batteries of light artillery were out on the streets, and the city was braced up in tense excitement. Just after the people had gone to church on that day, about half-past 10, two men rode down Charles Street, in a sweeping gallop, from beyond the boundary to Lexington and down Lexington to the city hall. They shouted as they flashed by, The Yankees are coming, the Yankees are coming! Twenty-four hundred of Pennsylvania troops, only half o
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: Maryland under Federal military power. (search)
landers. They were devoted to the Union, but they had no conception of the force and duty of courage and chivalry. The First Maryland under Kenly was the only Maryland regiment on the Union side. The Confederate Marylanders, on the other hand, embodied the faith and pride of the State. Not a historic family of Maryland but was represented in the Maryland Line. Five grandsons of John Eager Howard, of the Cowpens, carried sword or musket in the First Maryland regiment. A grandson of Charles Carroll of Carrollton rode as a private in Company K, First Virginia cavalry. Colonel Johnson, of the Maryland Line, rode at the head of seventy-two kinsmen, descendants of soldiers of the Revolution, his own flesh and blood! In the summer of 1862 the First and Second Eastern Shore regiments were raised under Colonels Wallace and Wilkins; the First and Second regiments Potomac home brigade under Colonels Maulsby and Johns; and the Purnell Legion of one regiment infantry, Col. William Louis S