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Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 7 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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and N. H. Smith; Privates Timothy McDonough, Thomas Dougherty, David Fitzgerald, Michael Monahan, John Hassett, John McKeefer, Jack W. White, Patrick McDonnell, William Gleason, Michael Carr, Thomas Hagerty, Timothy Huggins, Alexander McCabe, James Flemming, Patrick Fitzgerald, Thomas McKernon, Edward Pritchard, Charles Rheins, Timothy Hurley, John McGrath, Matthew Walshe, Patrick Sullivan, Michael Sullivan, ** Thomas Sullivan, Patrick Clare, John Hennessey, Hugh Deagan, Maurice Powers, Abner Carter, Daniel McMurray, Patrick Malone, James Corcoran, Patrick Abbott, John McNealis, Michael Egan, Daniel Donovan, John Wesley, John Anderson, John Flood, Peter O'Hare, Michael Delaney, Terence Mulhern. The inquiry may naturally arise how this small number of men could take charge of so large a body of prisoners. This required that to their valor they should add stratagem. A few men were placed on the parapet as sentinels, the rest were marched out as a guard to receive the prisoners an
he extensive earthworks behind which General Hooker's artillery was posted. Three times were these works carried, and as often were the brave assailants compelled to abandon them—twice by the retirement of the troops on their left, who fell back after a gallant struggle with superior numbers, and once by a movement of the enemy on their right caused by the advance of General Anderson. The left, being reenforced, finally succeeded in driving back the enemy, and the artillery under Lieutenant Colonels Carter and Jones, Operations in Northern Virginia being thrown forward to occupy favorable positions secured by the advance of the infantry, began to play with great precision and effect. Anderson, in the meantime, pressed gallantly forward directly upon Chancellorsville, his right resting upon the plank road and his left extending around the furnace, while McLaws made a strong demonstration to the right of the road. As the troops advancing upon the enemy's front and right converge
nd see General Grant. At that time Longstreet, covering the rear, was threatened by Meade, so that there was no ability to reenforce Gordon, and thus to explain why General Lee then realized that the emergency had arisen for the surrender of his army which, in his note to General Grant of the previous day, he had said he did not believe to exist. Colonel Venable, at early dawn, had left Gordon with about five thousand infantry, and Fitzhugh Lee with about fifteen hundred cavalry, and Colonel Carter's battalion of artillery, forming his line of battle to attack the enemy, which, so far as then known, consisted of Sheridan's cavalry, which had got in front of our retreating column. The assault was made with such vigor and determination as to drive Sheridan for a considerable distance; if this had been the only obstacle, the road would have been opened for Lee to resume his march toward Lynchburg. After Gordon had advanced nearly a mile, he was confronted by a large body of infantry
510-11. Pierce, 405-06. C Caleb Cushing (revenue cutter), 219. Cameron, Simon, 405-06. Campbell, Captain, 589. General, 266, 268. Judge John A., Member of Confederate peace commission, 521. Report of peace commission to Davis, 522-23. Canby, General, 474, 588, 591-92, 624, 628. Carondelet (gunboat), 25. Carpenter, —, court decision concerning seizure of goods, 291-92. Carpetbag rule, 641. Carr, General, 39. Michael, 200. Carroll, General, 37. Prison, 414. Carter, Colonel, 303-06, 558. Abner, 201. Casey, General, 129. Cash, Colonel, 601. Castlereagh, Viscount, 7. Cedar Run, Battle of, 265-69. Chalmers, General J. R., 43, 50, 548. Description of battle of Shiloh, 50-51. Chambersburg, Pa., burned, 448. Chancellorsville, Battles of, 300-08, 309. Account of Taylor, 309-10. Charleston, S. C., 174-75. Harbor defense, 171-72. Evacuation, 533. Chase, Judge, 518, 635. Chattanooga, Tenn., battles around, 358-65. Cheatham, General, 41, 4
t Lieut. R. W. Dowling; Sergeants, Corporals and Privates: Jack W. White, Timothy McDonough, Thomas Dougherty, David Fitzgerald, Michael Monohan, John Masset, John Mc-Keefer, Patrick McDonald, William Gleason, Michael Carr, Joseph Wilson, Thomas Hagerty, Thomas Huggins, Abram McCabe, James Fleming, Patrick Fitzgerald, Thomas McKernan, Edward Pritchard, Charles Rheims, Timothy Hurley, John McGrath, Matthew Walshe, Patrick Sullivan, Patrick Clare, John Hennessy, Hugh Deagon, Maurice Powers, Abner Carter, Daniel McMurray, Patrick Malone, James Corcoran, Patrick Abbot, John McNealus, Michael Eagan, Daniel Donovan, John Wesley, John Anderson, John Flood, Peter O'Hara, Mike Delany and Terrence Mulhern. The above were enlisted men. Lieut. N. H. Smith, a Louisianian, and Dr. George Bailey, assistant surgeon, volunteered to aid the gunners in the fort, both taking their places at the guns. These names deserve to go down in Texas history as of men who were heroes in a naval battle in defense
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sabine Pass. (search)
ling and N. H. Smith; Privates Timothy McDonough, Thomas Dougherty, David Fitzgerald, Michael Monahan, John Hassett, John McKeefer, Jack W. White, Patrick McDonnell, William Gleason, Michael Carr, Thomas Hagerty, Timothy Huggins, Alexander McCabe, James Flemming, Patrick Fitzgerald, Thomas McKernon, Edward Pritchard, Charles Rheins, Timothy Hurley, John McGrath, Matthew Walshe, Patrick Sullivan, Michael Sullivan, Thomas Sullivan, Patrick Clare, John Hennessey, Hugh Deagan, Maurice Powers, Abner Carter, Daniel McMurray, Patrick Malone, James Corcoran, Patrick Abbott, John McNealis, Michael Egan, Daniel Donovan, John Wesley, John Anderson, John Flood, Peter O'Hare, Michael Delaney, Terence Mulhern. The inquiry may naturally arise how this small number of men could take charge of so large a body of prisoners. This required that to their valor they should add strategem. A few men were placed on the parapet as sentinels, the rest were marched out as a guard to receive the prisoners an