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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 1: ancestry. (search)
on rarely equaled. His book, called the Memoirs of the War of 76, is the standard work to-day of events in the war in the Southern Department of the United States. Two editions of it had been exhausted, and in 1869 a third was issued by his son, R. E. Lee, who, forgetful of his own great deeds, was desirous only of perpetuating those of his distinguished father. General Henry Lee was twice married: first to Matilda, the daughter of Philip Ludwell Lee, of Stratford, and afterward to Anne Hill Carter, daughter of Charles Hill Carter, of Shirley. Four children were born from the first marriage. The eldest was named after his beloved commander, General Nathanael Greene, and died in infancy. The second son died when ten years old. The miniature of this child he always thereafter wore, and it is still preserved in the family. The third son, Henry, was born in 1787, and died in Paris, France, January 30, 1837. He graduated at William and Mary College, and served with credit in the
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. (search)
Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. Seventy-five years after the birth of Washington, Robert Edward, the fourth son of General Henry Lee and Anne Hill Carter, was born at Stratford, Westmoreland County, Virginia, on the 19th of January, 1807. If he inherited much from a long and illustrious line of paternal ancestors, he no less fell heir to the strong characteristics of his mother's family, one of the oldest and best in Virginia. The unselfishness, generosity, purity, and faithfulness of the Virginia Carters are widely known, and they have always been true to all occasions true. In his mother was personified all the gentle and sweet traits of a noble woman. Her whole life was admirable, and her love for her children beyond all other thoughts. To her watchful care they were early confided by the long absence and death of her distinguished husband. Robert was four years old when his father removed the family to Alexandria, six when he vis
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
8, 229, 238, 239, 240; his corps at Petersburg, 355. Burnt House Fields, 4. Bustamente, General, mentioned, 32. Butler, General Benjamin F., mentioned, 110, 323, 340; bottled up, 341. Butterfield, General, Daniel, mentioned, 226, 241, 302. Calhoun, John C., mentioned, 43. Cameron, Simon, mentioned, 88, 103. Campbell Court House, 387. Camp Cooper, Texas, 59, 61, 66, 68, 69. Carnot, quotation from, 49. Carrick's Ford, 15. Carroll, Governor, of Maryland, 300. Carter, Anne Hill, 16. Carter, Charles Hill, 16. Casey, General, Silas, 167. Catumseh, a chief, 73. Cavalry contest at Gettysburg, 298. Cavalry raids, 266. Cemetery Heights, 292. Cemetery Hill, 273. Cemetery Ridge, 289-296. Cerro Gordo, battle of, 38, 40. Chambliss, General John R., killed, 362. Champe, Sergeant, 9. Chancellorsville, battle of, 241. Chapman, Major, William, 63. Chapultepec, battle of, 41, 42. Charleston Harbor, 86. Charles II, 3, 4. Chase, Salmon P., 2
forth his claims to military fame in an adequately expert fashion, but to the truth of which it may perhaps bring a small bit of not valueless testimony—the testimony of personal conviction. For a fuller, though necessarily limited treatment of Lee's character and career reference may be made to the writer's volume in the Beacon biographies, which has guided him in the present sketch. Robert Edward Lee, the third son of the cavalry leader Light Horse Harry Lee by his second wife, Anne Hill Carter, was born at the family mansion, Stratford, in Westmoreland County, Virginia, on January 19, 1807. On Lee was essentially a Virginian Old Christ Church at Alexandria. Virginia. The church attended by both Washington and Lee calls up associations that explain the reference of General Adams. In 1811, at the age of four, Robert E. Lee removed from Westmoreland County to Alexandria, which remained his home until he entered West Point, in 1825. During these years he was gaining his