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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
of this day he had, in the performance of customary guard duty, been posted at the rampart, near the flag staff, to watch for any movements of the enemy that might indicate the formation of an assaulting column. At the end of his tour, Lieutenant Cyrus Carter started from the guard quarters to relieve him. Carter told me that as he crossed the parade, he did so with the profound conviction that he would be struck down before reaching the other side, so appalling was the storm of projectiles tCarter told me that as he crossed the parade, he did so with the profound conviction that he would be struck down before reaching the other side, so appalling was the storm of projectiles that tore up the ground around him. What was his surprise, therefore, to find the sentinel, not sheltered behind the parapet, as it was intended he should be, but quietly walking back and forth upon its very crest, for the expressed reason that he couldn't see good down thar. The flag staff had been shattered at his side, and with a strip torn from his shirt, he had tied the colors to the stump and continued his walk. As may be well supposed our charcoal burner escaped criticism after that.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
of this day he had, in the performance of customary guard duty, been posted at the rampart, near the flag staff, to watch for any movements of the enemy that might indicate the formation of an assaulting column. At the end of his tour, Lieutenant Cyrus Carter started from the guard quarters to relieve him. Carter told me that as he crossed the parade, he did so with the profound conviction that he would be struck down before reaching the other side, so appalling was the storm of projectiles tCarter told me that as he crossed the parade, he did so with the profound conviction that he would be struck down before reaching the other side, so appalling was the storm of projectiles that tore up the ground around him. What was his surprise, therefore, to find the sentinel, not sheltered behind the parapet, as it was intended he should be, but quietly walking back and forth upon its very crest, for the expressed reason that he couldn't see good down thar. The flag staff had been shattered at his side, and with a strip torn from his shirt, he had tied the colors to the stump and continued his walk. As may be well supposed our charcoal burner escaped criticism after that.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
rtillery); Macon's (Richmond Fayette Artillery); Watson's (Second Richmond Howitzers); Smith's (Third Richmond Howitzers); Coke's—(6?). Nelson's Battalion, Major William Nelson.—Ancell's Battery; Huckstep's; Kirkpatrick's; Milledge's—(4). Cults's Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Cutts.—Blackshear's Battery; Rose's; Lane's; Patterson's—(4). With D. H Hill. Jones's Battalion, Major H. P. Jones.—Wimbush's Battery; Turner's; Peyton's (Fry's); R. C. M. Page's—(4). D. H. Hill had also Carter's (King William Artillery); Bondurant's (Jeff. Davis Artillery), and Hardaway's Battery—(3). With McLaws's Division.—Read's Battery; Carleton's; Lloyd's (?); Manly's—(4). Moody's Battery (1), was attached to Colonel S. D. Lee's command. There were also with the army in September, G. W. Nelson's Battery (Hanover Artillery); T. J. Page's; Marmaduke Johnson's; Woolfolk's; Dearborn's—(5)—the assignment of which I do not know. This gives a total of for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
., Baltimore county, Md., February 3, 1883. My Dear Doctor,—I hope your publication of Colonel Scott's roster of our army may lead to perfecting it. Let me ask, Did Robertson's cavalry brigade contain the 17thVirginia battalion? In Robertson's report only the 2d, 6th, 7th and 12th Virginia regiments are enumerated. Does not this 17th creep in from an allusion in Stuart's report where 17th may be a misprint for 7th? Cannot Colonel Cutshaw or some of the artillery officers at hand (Colonel Carter for instance) give the assignment of the large number of batteries which Colonel Scott classes as miscellaneous? Some of them are, perhaps, only different names for batteries already enumerated. The artillery reports are, I know from experience, sometimes exasperating in their want of precision as regards names and commands, and it is therefore not surprising that Colonel Scott despaired of placing these batteries. Truly yours, W. Allan. I think there was no such organization as
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of Colonel George William Logan, on the engagement between the Federal gunboats and Fort Beauregard, on the 10th and Sixth May, 1863. (search)
Lieutenant Blanchard, and also to Lieutenants Abercrombie and Girtman, I am under obligations for their coolness and gallantry, and their untiring energy and activity throughout the two days bombardment. Lieutenants Parker, Duke, Castleberry and Carter, have my thanks for their exertions at the guns, and the precision of their fire. I regret to report that Lieutenant Carter was mortally wounded by a large fragment of shell while gallantly discharging his duties. Private Ford, of Spencer's cLieutenant Carter was mortally wounded by a large fragment of shell while gallantly discharging his duties. Private Ford, of Spencer's company, was severely wounded in the arm, and two others slightly wounded. These were the only casualties on our side. G. Spencer Mayo and George H. Wells, of the Engineer Department, volunteered for duty, and did good service. Great praise is due Lieutenant Buhlow, for having planned and executed this almost impregnable work. The nine and ten-inch rifled shells and heavy shot thrown at us failed in almost every instance to penetrate the parapets and casemates, those entering and bursting
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
pen plain of six hundred yards in width, under a severe fire from the enemy's artillery and infantry, the latter occupying a double line of defences on the brow of an elevation of some fifteen feet. The charge was a brilliant one and was successful, as part of the enemy's line was captured, but it was a fearful loss on our side. The loss of the Confederates, in officers, was unprecedentedly heavy. Eleven General officers were killed and wounded; among the killed were Cleburne, Granberry, Carter and Lewis. The army was thought to have become discouraged by the numerous disasters that had befallen it for many months past, and the officers, on this occasion, seem to have felt it to be their duty to give nerve to their troops by exposing themselves, to an extraordinary extent, to the dangers of the battle. All the field officers remained mounted during the charge. At daylight on the morning after the fight, Lieutenant Ritter rode over the field, and in the part of the line where