Your search returned 105 results in 36 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
ed his regiment in a brilliant charge upon the enemy's flank, routing and pursuing him to his stronghold; on the lamented Puller and his comrades fallen; on Lieut. Hill Carter, Third Virginia cavalry, and Adjt. Peter Fontaine, Fourth Virginia cavalry, whose individual prowess attracted my personal attention, and remark, the latteres of the enemy, and reformed again, facing about under a heavy fire from their artillery and small arms. The Third, in this charge, was in front, and First Lieutenant Hill Carter was very conspicuous in his behavior. From that time it was a succession of gallant charges by the various regiments, and once by the whole brigade inommanding, also mentions Privates Jos. Gilman, J. R. Gilman, Poindexter, Redd, Sydnor, Terry, and N. Priddy. In the Third, Captain Collins, Company H; Lieutenants Hill Carter and Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Patton Anderson of operations of his division from 30th of July to 31st of August, 1864, including the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia. (search)
nce the movement. It was about eleven o'clock before his rear and the head of my column got in motion. Much delay was experienced because of the want of roads and the absence of competent guides. The column was several times halted for an hour or more, because the advance had taken the wrong road, or to remove some obstruction. Just before day on the morning of the 31st a halt occurred while I was about the center of my command, and, riding forward to ascertain the cause, I met Brigadier-General Carter, now commanding Cheatham's division, who informed me that Major-General Cleburne, of IHardee's corps, who was in advance, had sent back to inform him that the enemy had taken possession of a bridge in his (Cleburne's) front, and that the troops must be halted until he (Cleburne) could reconnoitre the position and ascertain whether or not a passage of the stream could be effected. In the meantime, the better to be prepared against an attack should the enemy feel disposed to make it,
p, with great supplies, and drove the foe two miles from their encampment of the morning. The greatest and hottest fire was about four P. M., when Latham's and Carter's batteries got into action, supported by the Fourth and Fifth South-Carolina, First Virginia, Twelfth Mississippi, and other regiments. Having many valuables in Yet no artillery was present on our side up to this time. Some of the Lynchburgh (Latham's) battery now arrived on the scene, together with one or two pieces of Carter's battery; and although horses were goaded almost to death, it was found almost impossible to move them. Unhitching their teams, for breathing time, the men jumpt fell back in good order, waiting new dispositions and additional force. These were at hand, and the fight opened in front with terrific violence. Latham's and Carter's few pieces opened upon them, and belched forth grape and canister, scattering death in every direction, ploughing up the ground and cutting down the timber like
n the enemy, strongly posted upon high and advantageous ground. The line of battle formed was as follows: Longstreet on the right, resting on the Chickahominy swamp; A. P. Hill on his left; then Whiting, then Ewell, then Jackson, (the two latter under Jackson's command,) then D. H. Hill on the left of the line, the line extending in the form of a crescent beyond New Cold Harbor, south toward Baker's Mills. At about twelve o'clock M., the batteries of D. H. Hill, consisting of Hardaway's, Carter's, Bondurant's, Rhett's, Peyton's and Clarke's, under command of Majors Pierson and Jones, were massed on our left. Capt. Bondurant advanced to the front, and took position near the powerful batteries of the enemy's artillery. But it was soon found impossible to hold the position. He was overpowered and silenced. Other batteries soon, however, came forward successively to the front of the infantry, about three hundred yards in rear of Bondurant's position. Hardaway took up the fight wit
ued his retreat in a southeasterly direction towards his gunboats on James River. At eight o'clock A. M. Magruder recommenced the pursuit, advancing cautiously, but steadily, and shelling the forests and swamps in front as he progressed. This method of advance was kept up throughout the morning, and until four o'clock P. M., without coming up with the enemy. But between four and five o'clock our troops reached a large open field, a mile long and three quarters in width, on the farm of Dr. Carter. The enemy were strongly intrenched in a dense forest on the other side of this field. Their artillery, of about fifty pieces, could be plainly seen bristling on their freshly constructed earthworks. At ten minutes before five o'clock P. M., Gen. Magruder ordered his men to charge across the field and drive the enemy from their position. Gallantly they sprang to the encounter, rushing into the field at a full run. Instantly from the line of the enemy's breastworks a murderous storm o
ance above. The Lieutenant then returned to his command, avoiding the Richmond road, as it was full of the enemy, apparently. He got a negro, belonging to Mr. Hill Carter, to pilot him down to the landing. The darkey stated that his master had acted as colonel in the rebel army at Williamsburgh, but he got enough of it, and ha through this man's plantation the old chap rode down and demanded, Are you Yankee troops or confederate? The Lieutenant answered that they were Union troops. Mr. Carter then stated that he did not allow confederate troops to come on his plantation, as the gunboats shelled them, and would soon destroy his house. The Lieutenant , commanding Eleventh regiment volunteers, killed while gallantly leading his men; Lieut.-Col. J. D. Hines, Twelfth regiment volunteers; Color-Sergeants White and Carter, who were both killed, and Corporals Howett, of company D, and Buchanan, of company C, of the same regiments, for rescuing their regimental colors, when the color
. While there one of the Union gunboats threw a shell into a rebel party some distance above. The Lieutenant then returned to his command, avoiding the Richmond road, as it was full of the enemy, apparently. He got a negro, belonging to Mr. Hill Carter, to pilot him down to the landing. The darkey stated that his master had acted as colonel in the rebel army at Williamsburgh, but he got enough of it, and had left the army. While passing through this man's plantation the old chap rode down and demanded, Are you Yankee troops or confederate? The Lieutenant answered that they were Union troops. Mr. Carter then stated that he did not allow confederate troops to come on his plantation, as the gunboats shelled them, and would soon destroy his house. The Lieutenant assured him that he should be protected as far as they went. The Lieutenant got an old boat and two slaves to row him out to the Galena, Captain Rodgers. When about one half a mile from the boat he was met by a cut
A. A.D. C., of Col. Scammon's staff, for coolness and efficiency; Colonels George Crook, commanding Second brigade, and Hugh Ewing, commanding First brigade, for energy and skilful bravery; Lieuts. Furbay and Duffield, Thirtieth regiment volunteers, acting as aids to Col. Ewing, and who were both killed; Lieut.-Colonel A. H. Coleman, commanding Eleventh regiment volunteers, killed while gallantly leading his men; Lieut.-Col. J. D. Hines, Twelfth regiment volunteers; Color-Sergeants White and Carter, who were both killed, and Corporals Howett, of company D, and Buchanan, of company C, of the same regiments, for rescuing their regimental colors, when the color-sergeants were shot. The General commanding takes this opportunity to mention the gallant and meritorious conduct of Captain G. M. Bascom, A. A.G.; Lieuts. S. L. Christie, J. W. Conine, and The. Cox, aids-de-camp on his personal staff; brigade Surgeon W. W. Holmes, for his thorough attention to the duties of the medical departme
n perfect order. The officers and men under my command behaved coolly and bravely through the entire engagement. It would be injustice to make any distinction. Captain Carr, of company D, fell in the charge while boldly leading his men on. Captain Carter, of company I, fell as gloriously, with his face to the foe, as a soldier should. Lieut. Key, of company I, after the fall of Captain Carter, while bravely leading his boys in the charge, was seriously wounded in the knee. I must acknowleCaptain Carter, while bravely leading his boys in the charge, was seriously wounded in the knee. I must acknowledge in grateful terms the invaluable services throughout the day of the gallant soldier, Major Thomas L. P. Defrees. I also take great pleasure in bearing testimony to the promptness and bravery of Adjutant George R. Elstner, in his constant assistance throughout the engagement. Although out of the ordinary course of a report of this kind, still I hope you will permit me to make honorable mention of the bravery and timely assistance rendered me at a critical point of the engagement by Lieut. J
r guns were spiked, and the carriages cut down. The whole surface of the encampments was strewn with flour, meal, beans, rice, corn, and oats. They have lived fast and well, and .cost them nothing but so much trash as you or I would not stop to pick up. The great defect of the rebel army organization has been its commissary department. They have subsisted by pillage and robbery, as their forced circulation of the issues of rotten shinplasters, banks and firms can be characterized by no milder terms. The capture of the Gap will have important results on the future operations of the war, as it can safely be made the base for future operations against the further south rebels. The situation here may thus be summed up: the rebels under Gens. Smith, Stevenson, and Barton, to the number of thirteen thousand, have retreated to Binghamton, Virginia; Gen. Morgan, with his main column, occupies Cumberland Gap; Gen. Carter, with his force, occupies Tazewell. Ben. --Cincinnati Commercial.
1 2 3 4