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Lieut. Stephen Frost1 Stephen Cutter1 John Adams1 William Cutter1 Jeduthun Wellington1 Moses Hovey1 Benjamin Cooper1 Jonathan Robbins1 Seth Stone1 Capt. Samuel Carter1 Josiah Hall1 Thomas Adams, Jr.1 John Cutter, 3d1 Thomas Cutter1 Jonathan Perry1 John Locke1 Josiah Wilson1 James Frost1 John Stone1 Jonathan Lock Crafts, Joseph. Craggin, John. Crane, Nathan. Curtis, Daniel T. Cutler, Samuel. Cutler, Samuel B. Cutter, Nehemiah. Cutter, William F. Carter, George. Child, Nathan. Carter, Nathan C. Clark, Hosea. Clark, Horace. Daley, David. Dana, Edmund T. Dana, Joseph. Dana, Joseph, Jr. DaCarter, Nathan C. Clark, Hosea. Clark, Horace. Daley, David. Dana, Edmund T. Dana, Joseph. Dana, Joseph, Jr. Dana, Richard H. Dane, Joseph. Danforth, Otis. Dascomb, Daniel. Davenport, John. Davis, Asa. Davis, Eliphalet. Derby, Loring. Dickson, Edward. Ditson, Thomas. Dodge, John. Dowse, Thomas. Dudley, Ephraim. Dunbar, Alpheus. Dana, Francis W. Dudley, John. Ditson, William. Edwards, Abrah
was a mill-wright, and removed to Woodbridge, N. J., where he d. 17 Dec. 1756;. 10. John, s. of William (5), m. Lydia Harrington, and had Lydia, b. 13 Ap. 1710, m. Seth Reed; Rebecca, b. 13 July 1712, m. Zechariah Hill 10 Feb. 1731-2, and Samuel Carter 11 Dec. 1770; (Hannah, b. 14 June 1715, m. John Brooks; Mary, b. 1 June 1717, pub. Ephraim Frost, Jr., 16 Mar. 1739, and d. 20 Oct. 1805, a. 88; John, b. 13 June 1720; Abigail, b. 21 Ap. 1722, m. Samuel Frost 19 Feb. 1741; Richard, b. 9 Mar. had Jane, b. 4 Oct. 1688, m. Joseph Robbins, 3 Aug. 1709; he d. and she m. John Green before 1737; Elizabeth, bap. 24 July 1698, m. Hubbard Russell, 9 May 1710; William, bap. 24 July 1698; John, bap. 24 July 1698; Margery, b. 11 Dec. 1698, m. Samuel Carter of Woburn, 30 June 1719; Edward, b. 16 Jan. 1701-2. John the f. d. 22 Mar. 1736-7, a. 81; his w. Margaret d. 6 Oct. 1734, a. 70. 3. William, S. of John (2), m. Ruth, dau. of Solomon Prentice, 12 June 1718, and had William, b. 26 Ap. 1719;
aniel; Jacob; Mary (last two bap. 24 July 1698); Ebenezer, bap. 2 July 1699; John, bap. 23 Ap. 1704; Richard, bap. 21 Oct. 1716, d. 6 Aug. 1717; Elizabeth, bap. 26 Jan. 1717-18, m. John Williams of Groton 5 May 1741. 9. Richard, s. of William (5), was a mill-wright, and removed to Woodbridge, N. J., where he d. 17 Dec. 1756;. 10. John, s. of William (5), m. Lydia Harrington, and had Lydia, b. 13 Ap. 1710, m. Seth Reed; Rebecca, b. 13 July 1712, m. Zechariah Hill 10 Feb. 1731-2, and Samuel Carter 11 Dec. 1770; (Hannah, b. 14 June 1715, m. John Brooks; Mary, b. 1 June 1717, pub. Ephraim Frost, Jr., 16 Mar. 1739, and d. 20 Oct. 1805, a. 88; John, b. 13 June 1720; Abigail, b. 21 Ap. 1722, m. Samuel Frost 19 Feb. 1741; Richard, b. 9 Mar. 1725-6; Thomas, b. 2 Nov. 1727, d. 21 May 1737; Martha, b. 31 Mar. 1731, m. Jonathan Stone 21 May 1747; Ammi, b. 4 Nov. 1733; Ruhamah, twin with Ammi, b. 4 Nov. 1733, d. 7 June 1737. John the f. was a farmer, was elected Deacon of the church in Meno
nnah, bap. here, m. Stephen Francis 16 Sept. 1633; John, b. 21 Mar. 1655-6. William the f. d. 5 Aug. 1692, a. 78; his wife Jane d. 4 Dec. 1689, a. 73. 2. John, s. of William (1), m. Margery (or Margaret), dau. of Edward Winship, 12 May 1687, and had Jane, b. 4 Oct. 1688, m. Joseph Robbins, 3 Aug. 1709; he d. and she m. John Green before 1737; Elizabeth, bap. 24 July 1698, m. Hubbard Russell, 9 May 1710; William, bap. 24 July 1698; John, bap. 24 July 1698; Margery, b. 11 Dec. 1698, m. Samuel Carter of Woburn, 30 June 1719; Edward, b. 16 Jan. 1701-2. John the f. d. 22 Mar. 1736-7, a. 81; his w. Margaret d. 6 Oct. 1734, a. 70. 3. William, S. of John (2), m. Ruth, dau. of Solomon Prentice, 12 June 1718, and had William, b. 26 Ap. 1719; Solomon, b. 8 June 1720, d. 3 Aug. 1720; Solomon, bap. 27 Aug. 1721, d. young; Ruth, bap. 21 July 1723, d. 19 Sept. 1723; Josiah, bap. 15 Nov. 1724; Ruth, bap. 23 Oct. 1726, m.——Teel; Margery, bap. 12 Jan. 1728-9, m. Joseph Cook, Jr., 13 May 1756; J
o the ditch, subjecting themselves to the aim of its occupants and the concentrated fire from the enemy's lines A few shell used as hand-grenades bursting among the enemy soon caused them to surrender. . . . In the pursuit Lieut.-Col. J. Wrigley captured the other stand of colors. The loss of the legion during the siege of Vicksburg was 10 officers killed, wounded 37, missing 1; 37 enlisted men killed, 153 wounded, 7 missing; total 245. Among the killed were Maj. Allen Cameron, and Capts. Samuel Carter and J. A. Ledbetter. The Second Texas, in Moore's brigade, lost 21 killed and 56 wounded in the battle of May 22d. General Moore reported that the enemy made determined assaults, but were gloriously repulsed. Their greatest efforts were made against that portion of the line occupied by that veteran and gallant regiment the Second Texas. . . They were easily repulsed in the morning, but in the afternoon charge they were more determined, coming up even into the outer ditch of the Se
ut himself in communication with General Hood, who was preparing to enter upon his disastrous campaign to Franklin and Nashville. On the 27th of January, 1865, Gen. Richard Taylor, commanding department, assigned General Forrest to the command of the district of Mississippi and Louisiana. On the 13th of the following month Brig.-Gen. W. H. Jackson was assigned to the command of all of the Tennesseeans in the district. Bell's and Rucker's brigades, the Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Nixon's and Carter's regiments, and the Twelfth Confederate were consolidated into six regiments, to constitute two brigades, one commanded by Col. T. H. Bell, soon made brigadier-general; and in a few weeks Brig.-Gen. Alexander W. Campbell, just returned from prison and promoted, was assigned to the Second brigade. On the 22d of March, Major-General Wilson of the Federal army, with three divisions of cavalry, 10,000 strong, left Chickasaw, Ala. On the 30th he reached Elyton, whence Croxton's command was s
navy. The State of Tennessee furnished 31,000 white men to the Federal government during the war between the States. Among them were David G. Farragut and Samuel Carter. Admiral Farragut commanded the largest and most powerful force that had ever been controlled by any American naval officer, and the results of the operatio reduced the war from the position of a contest having many probabilities of success to a purely defensive struggle for safety. (Capt. James D. Bulloch.) Rear-Admiral Carter, then a lieutenant-commander, U. S. N., was withdrawn from the navy early in 1861, and commissioned as a brigadier-general of volunteers, charged with the oeat body of the people of east Tennessee, and secured that division of the State (in the heart of the Confederate States) to the Federal government. Farragut and Carter, both natives of east Tennessee, were important factors in making Confederate success impossible. Tennesseeans in the United States navy who resigned to accept
exington, William Symmes and Josiah Symmes of Medford, Henry Putnam, Henry Gardner, Thomas Hutchinson and Benjamin Teel and Benjamin Teel, Jr., of Charlestown, Samuel Carter and Samuel Carter, Jr., of Woburn; praying they may be incorporated into a Town, or District, by the bounds therein mentioned, have considered the same, with tSamuel Carter, Jr., of Woburn; praying they may be incorporated into a Town, or District, by the bounds therein mentioned, have considered the same, with the answers from the several towns they now respectively belong to; have likewise heard all the parties concerned, and beg leave to report as their opinion, that the prayer of the petition be so far granted as that the inhabitants of the said Second Parish in Cambridge, together with the petitioners now inhabitants of the town of Ephraim Frost, Walter Russell, Thomas Russell, Committee): The fore seat upon the floor below: Messrs. Nehemiah Cutter, Edward Fillebrown, Daniel Brown, Samuel Carter, Jr., Ammi Cutter. The second seat below: Messrs. George Cutter, Patten Russell, Thomas Cutter, Isaac Winship, Simon Holden, Timothy Symmes, Joseph Frost, Joh
cca Carter, d. 1 Feb. 1797, a. 84 (g. s. Arlington)—wid. of Capt. Samuel Carter. [He m. first Margery Dickson, of Camb., 30 June, 1719, who He d. 21 Jan. 1787, a. 92 (g. s. Arlington). 1787, Jan. 21. Capt. Samuel Carter died, and buried this week, aged 92 years or more.—Diary of of Philip's War. Lieut. John Carter, his son, and father of Capt. Samuel Carter above, had a son Benjamin, who entered the military service and was killed by Indians near Dunstable, 6 Sept. 1724. Samuel Carter and Samuel Carter, Jr., of Woburn, are mentioned in the History of PreSamuel Carter, Jr., of Woburn, are mentioned in the History of Precinct in this work, under 1761. The latter d. 14 (buried 16) Sept. 1806, a. 84, was intombed in a walled enclosure in a field on the present Aug. 1732); Rebecca, who m. first, Zechariah Hill, and second, Samuel Carter—at the time of her death the mother of 11 children, grandmotherter (par. 44). See Wyman, 501. Mrs. Rebecca, the mother, m. Capt. Samuel Carter, of Woburn, 11 Dec. 1770. Her gravestone (1797, a. 84) say
27, 28, 30, 78, 83, 94, 96, 107, 110-13, 120, 121, 131, 140, 164, 167, 168-70, 188, 193, 199-201, 203, 216, 233, 234, 246, 266, 268,269, 270, 272, 274, 290,311, 313, 319, 321 Butters, 187 Byrne, 349 Cady, 143, 171, 172, 173, 178, 360 Caldwell, 346 Callan, 344 Campbell, 137, 201, 341 Cannon, 347 Capell, 201, 210 Capen, 201, 227, 286 Carleton or Carlton, 172, 176 Carlisle, 141, 201, 278 Carnes, 136, 201 Carrigan, 342 Carroll, 201, 300, 339, 344, 345 Carter, 38, 94, 95, 172, 173, 189, 201, 202,212, 268, 279, 318, 327 Carteret and DeCarteret, 22, 27, 38, 167, 168, 199, 202, 203, 279, 318 Carthew, 16, 16 Cassidy, 348 Ceiley, 166 Center, 68 Chadwick, 149,184, 203 Chaffin, 344, 346 Chamberlain and Chamberlin, 9,199, 103,229 Chambers, 203 Champney, 20, 203, 236, 279 Chandler, 145, 203, 234 Charles Edward, 60 Chase, 140, 171 Chauncey, 31 Cheever, 203, 217 Chick, 348 Child and Childs, 108, 203, 204, 2
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