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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas H. Carter or search for Thomas H. Carter in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
pringfield and Enfield muskets, Mississippi and Maynard rifles, Hall's and Sharp's carbines, and arms of English, German, Austrian and Belgian manufacture, of many different calibres. I had at one time samples of more than twenty patterns of infantry weapons alone. Much the same state of things existed as to artillery, both seacoast and field guns. As an illustration I may mention that when I joined Genl. R. E. Rodes' brigade for field service, the battery of Capt. (afterwards Col.) Thos. H. Carter, which was attached to the brigade, had a scratch lot of guns consisting of two smooth-bore six-pounders, one twelve-pounder howitzer, these all of bronze, and one three-inch iron rifle. As a natural consequence there was serious trouble at the arsenals and in the field, from confusion in regard to ammunition—trouble which was made worse by the gauges in use in the ordnance shops, which were not very accurate and often did not agree among themselves. This fact primarily led to my beco
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Armistead's portrait presented. (search)
ing up his heavy reserves. On the right and on the left the enemy's lines were still intact. On both flanks fierce assaults would soon be made on Pickett's men. Colonel, said Armistead to the commanding officer of the Fifty-third, we cannot stay here. A word to Martin was enough. Forward with the colors, he cried, and over the wall they went, Armistead and Martin; and with them went a gallant band resolved that day to conquer or die. The flag of the Fifty-third regiment, borne by Lieutenant Carter, flashed like a meteor in the van. The indomitable Armistead, his hat on the point of his sword, towered before them like a pillar of fire. Follow me, boys; give them the cold steel. A hundred and fifty undaunted men followed their chief. They left behind them the stone wall. They passed the earth works. They seized the cannon that, double shotted at ten yards distance, had torn our ranks with canister. Victory seemed within their grasp. But alas! the support they looked for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incident of the battle of Winchester, or Opequon. (search)
f he ought to have captured all of Early's army. On the contrary, he felt his way forward with extreme caution, and up to 4 o'clock in the afternoon, notwithstanding his overwhelming force, he was checked and beaten by Early in the battle, which for sturdy valor has no superior in the whole war. Ramseur, on our right, held his own against Sheridan's assault most gallantly. Rodes came in and drove the enemy's front, a splendid achievement. The battle trembled in the balance, as Colonel Thomas H. Carter says, and the artillery, of which he was the chief, rolled back in disaster and dismay the assaults made upon it. The turn of the battle came about the time the Eighth Corps and Torbet's whole corps of cavalry, with the exception of Wilson's division (which had been thrown to our right and held in check by Lomax), advanced, overlapping the small commands of Fitz Lee and Breckenridge a mile in distance and seeming to cover the whole face of the earth with their massive numbers. Just
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Color Episode of the one hundred and Forty-Ninth regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
f fourteen. The enemy's infantry, which had been heavily engaged with Meredith's and Cutler's brigades a great part of the forenoon, were now making new dispositions and awaiting reenforce-ments. In the meantime the infantry fire was confined to the skirmish lines, while the artillery fire passed over our heads. Close on to I P. M. the scene changed. The enemy's re-enforcements were now arriving on the field. The first intimation we had of it was the fire of one of their batteries (Carter's) stationed on Oak hill, north of us. The crash of a shell through the tops of the old cherry trees along the lane admonished our Commander that we were exposed to an enfilade fire which might do us great damage. He at once swung our left out on the pike in line with the right, and ordered a left side-step movement to bring as much of the regiment as possible into the shelter of the dry ditch on the southern edge of the pike, in which we then lay down. We were now comparatively safe from
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Affidavit of Supervisors of Co. C, 149th regiment. Pa. Vols. (search)
ored the colors while north of the pike and then returned to the fence south of the road, the position from which they had opened fire and advanced. (2) Philadelphia, March 9, 1906. Dear Captain Bassler: Thanks for your pamphlet on the First Day's Fight, which I read (for the second time), with interest. It was always in my mind that our three regiments being hidden from observation by Hill's men, but in sight of Rodes' men, the two regimental colors were placed to draw the fire of Carter's batteries, on Oak Hill. For this purpose the flag of the 500th was planted near the stone quarry and that of the 149th not far from where the Reynolds monument is, with the color guard close by, at the N. W. corner of the barn. As I was with Gen. Stone, along about 1:30, reconnoitering, I got his views as to the purpose of this arrangement, and saw with him the benefit of it. All of a sudden I saw Daniel's men swoop down upon our brigade from the northwest; and as they rushed toward
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
roy, 16. Broun, Major Thos. L., 349. Brown, Col. J. Thompson, 64. Buchanan, Capt. 40. Bulloch, Capt., 49. Bryan, Joseph, his service in Mosby's Command, 348. Cabell, Gen. W. L. 255. Carey, Misses made Confederate flag, 256. Carter, Lt. Robert. 50. Carrington J. McDowell, 337. Cemetery Ridge, 150 Chambersburg, The burning of, 152, Christian, Col. C. B.. 236. Clay, Clement C., 249. Cobb, Gen. Howell, 18. Cold Harbor, Recollections of Second Battle of, 319. Gorgas Col. W. C., 17. Grandstaff, Lieut. D. W., 366. Greely Horace, asked to bring about speedy trial of Jefferson Davis, 214, 252. Grimes', Battery, Centennial of, 169. Hampton Gen. Wade, 35. Halleck, Gen. 99. Harrison, Capt. Carter B., 56 Heckman's Brigade? Who captured, 181. Heth, Gen., intended to cover his error, 369. Hodges, Col. James G., 184; where he fell, 195. Hoffman, Fred., of Color Guard, 275. Hooker. Gen. Joseph, 82,98. Huidekoper, H. S, 290.