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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., On the road to Petersburg: notes of an officer of the C. S. A. (search)
ng-room, to which the ladies have not descended, though they have sent polite messages touching breakfast. It is with real historic interest that I gaze upon this old mansion. For this is Ampthill, the former residence of the famous Colonel Archibald Cary of the first Revolution — the man of the low stature, the wide shoulders, the piercing eyes, and the stern will. He was of noble descent, being the heir apparent to the barony of Hunsdon when he died; sat in the Virginia Convention of 17mporaries fixed on him — with the ears of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and George Mason, listening to hear him speak, and was the sort of man who will stand no nonsense. When the question of appointing Patrick Henry Dictator was agitated, Cary said to Henry's brother-in-law, Sir, tell your brother that if he is made Dictator, my dagger shall be in his breast before the sunset of that day! There spoke Cary of Ampthill, as they used to call him — a man who religiously kept his word, sayi<
h considered it a privilege to act as nurses and hospital attendants. So many were they and such valuable services did they render, that it is almost an injustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealth
h considered it a privilege to act as nurses and hospital attendants. So many were they and such valuable services did they render, that it is almost an injustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealth
atal to the liberties of a free people. The county of Westmoreland dwelt also on the new Revenue Act, as well as on the Billeting Act. The freeholders of Prince Williams enumerated all three, which, like the Stamp Act, would shackle North America with slavery. On the seventh, the illustrious Bland reported Resolutions, reaffirming the exclusive right of the American Assemblies to tax the American Colonies; and they were unanimously confirmed. A committee of twelve, including Bland and Archibald Cary, prepared a Petition to the King, a Memorial to the House of Lords, and a Remonstrance to the House of Commons, which, after being carefully considered and amended, were unanimously adopted. On Friday, the fifteenth, Bland invited a conference with the Council; and the Council with Blair, Blair to Hillsborough, 18 May, 1768, inclosing the Virginia Petition, Memorial and Remonstrance. as acting President after Fauquier's death, agreed to the papers which the House had prepared, and wh
riends, with their Speaker as Moderator. They adopted the Resolves which Washington had brought with him from Mount Vernon; and which formed a well digested, stringent and practicable scheme of non-importation, until all the unconstitutional revenue acts should be repealed. Such too was their zeal against the Slave-trade, they made a special covenant with one another, not to import any slaves, nor purchase any imported. These associations were signed by Peyton Randolph, Richard Bland, Archibald Cary, Robert Carter Nicholas, Richard Henry Lee, Washington, Carter Braxton, Henry, Jefferson, Nelson, and all the Burgesses of Virginia there assembled; Burk's History of Virginia, III. 348, 349. and were then sent throughout the country for the signature of every man in the Colony. Compare Washington to Colonel Bassett, Mount Vernon, 18 June, 1769; in Maxwell's Virginia Historical Register, III. 220. The voice of the Old Dominion roused the most temperate Province of Pennsylvania
e their commerce as an act of independence; the continental congress had interfered with the old restraints on foreign trade as little as the necessity for purchasing military stores would permit; they had moreover, with few exceptions, suspended alike importations and exportations, so that New England, for example, could not export fish to Spain, even to exchange it for powder; the impulse for a world-wide commerce came from Virginia. On Saturday, the twentieth of January, on motion of Archibald Cary, her convention gave its opinion in favor of opening the ports of the colonies to all persons willing to trade with them, Great Britain, Ireland, and the British West Indies excepted, and instructed her delegates in the general congress to use their endeavors to have such a measure adopted, so soon as exportation from North America should be permitted. That this recommendation should have been left after ten months of war to be proposed by a provincial convention, is another evidence of
, Dunmore especially reported from the low country the family of the Lees and the whole family of Cary of Hampton, of whom even the sisters, married to a Fairfax and a Nicholas, cheered on their connelerk, Richard Bland recommended Edmund Pendleton to be chosen president, and was seconded by Archibald Cary; while Thomas Johnson of Louisa, and Bartholomew Dandridge proposed Thomas Ludwell Lee. For olved itself into a committee of the whole on the state of the colony; and on the fifteenth Archibald Cary reported resolu- Chap. LXIV.} 1776. May. tions which had been drafted by Pendleton, offerepointed to prepare a declaration of rights and a plan of government. Among the members were Archibald Cary, Patrick Henry, the aged Richard Bland, Edmund Randolph, son of the attorney general, who waunselfish Chap. LXIV.} 1776. May. attachment to human freedom. On the twenty seventh of May, Cary from the committee presented to the convention the declaration of rights, which Mason had drafted
paid by him for a license to sell goods which was never used by him by reason of his absence in the military service of the country. By Mr. Christian, of Angusta — Of changing the names of the counties of Scott and Buchanan, to Carrington and Cary, in honor, respectively, of Judge Paul Carrington, for 46 years eminent in the service of Virginia and of Archibald Cary, so long distinguished in the colonial and the revolutionary councile of this Commonwealth. By Mr.Newman--Of establishingArchibald Cary, so long distinguished in the colonial and the revolutionary councile of this Commonwealth. By Mr.Newman--Of establishing a more efficient system of police thoughout the Commonwealth. By Mr.Thomas, of Fairfax — Of additional legislation to secure to the citizens of this Commonwealth the benefit of the right contained in the 8th section of the Declaration of Rights. Southern Insurance Company On motion of Mr. Thomas, of Fairfax, the joint resolution changing the office of the Southern Protection Insurance Company, and its place of meeting, was taken up and passed. Impressed horses. Mr. Christ