hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 38 results in 14 document sections:

1 2
Lord himself wrote it, and I was but the humblest of instruments in his hand. To Him alone should be given all the praise. Although the publication of the National era has been long since suspended, the journal was in those days one of decided literary merit and importance. On its title-page, with the name of Dr. Gamaliel Bailey as editor, appeared that of John Greenleaf Whittier as corresponding editor. In its columns Mrs. Southworth made her first literary venture, while Alice and Phoebe Cary, Grace Greenwood, and a host of other well-known names were published with that of Mrs. Stowe, which appeared last of all in its prospectus for 1851. Before the conclusion of Uncle Tom's Cabin Mrs. Stowe had so far outstripped her contemporaries that her work was pronounced by competent judges to be the most powerful production ever contributed to the magazine literature of this country, and she stood in the foremost rank of American writers. After finishing her story Mrs. Stowe pen
ems for and against him, 457. C. Cabin, the, literary centre, 185. Cairnes, Prof., on the Fugitive slave Law, 146. Calhoun falsifies census, 509. Calvinism, J. R. Lowell's sympathy with, 335. Cambridgeport, H. B. S. reads in, 491. Carlisle, Lord, praises Uncle Tom's Cabin, 164; Mrs. Stowe's reply, 164; writes introduction to Uncle Tom, 192; H. B. S. dines with, 228; farewell to, 248; letter from H. B. S. to on moral effect of slavery, 164; letter to H. B. S. from, 218. Cary, Alice and Phosbe, 157. Casaubon and Dorothea, criticism by H. B. S. on, 471. Catechisms, Church and Assembly, H. B. S.'s early study of, 6,7. Chapman, Mrs., Margaret Weston, 310. Charpentier of Paris, publishes Uncle Tom's Cabin, 192; eulogy of that work, 242. Chase, Salmon P., 69, 85. Chelsea, H. B. S. reads in, 492. Chicago, readings in, 498. Children of H. B. S., picture of three eldest, 90; appeal to, by H. B. S. 157; described by H. B. S., 198; letters to, from H. B.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Standard and popular Library books, selected from the catalogue of Houghton, Mifflin and Co. (search)
. royal 8vo, $9.00. Crown 8vo, $4.50. 1 vol. 12mo, $3.00. The Odyssey. 2 vols. royal 8vo, $9.00. Crown 8vo, $4.50, 1 vol. 12mo, $3.00. John Burroughs. Wake-Robin. Illustrated. 16mo, $1.50. Winter Sunshine. 16mo. $1.50. Birds and Poets. 16mo, $1.50. Locusts and Wild Honey. 16mo, $r.50. Pepacton, and Other Sketches. 16mo, $1.50. Thomas Carlyle. Essays. With Portrait and Index. Four volumes, crown 8vo, $7.50. Popular Edition. Two volumes, $3.50. Alice and Phoebe Cary. Poems. Household Edition. 12mo, $2.00. Library Edition. Portraits and 24 illustrations. 8vo, $4.0000. Poetical Works, including Memorial by Mary Clemmer. I vol. 8vo, $3.50. Full gilt, $4.00. Ballads for Little Folk. Illustrated. $r.50. L. Maria Child. Looking toward Sunset. 4to, $2.50. James Freeman Clarke. Ten Great Religions. 8vo, $3.00. Common Sense in Religion. 12mo, $2.00. Memorial and Biographical Sketches. 12mo, $2.00. Exotics. $1.00. J. Fenimo
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, V. The fugitive slave epoch (search)
or, and he could not fail to go out strengthened and stimulated. Sometimes the Whittiers had guests; and Lizzie delighted to tell how their mother was once met at the door by two plump maidens who announced that they had come from Ohio mainly to see her son. She explained that he was in Boston. No matter; they would come in and await his return. But he might be away a week No matter; they would willingly wait that time for such a pleasure. So in they came. They proved to be Alice and Phoebe Cary, whose earlier poems, which had already preceded them, were filled with dirges and despair; but they were the merriest of housemates, and as the poet luckily returned next day, they stayed as long as they pleased, and were welcome. The invigorating influence of the Whittier household supplied the tonic needed in those trying days. The Fugitive Slave Law had just passed, and a year or two after Garrison had proudly showed a row of escaped negroes sitting on the platform of an anti-sla
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
bert, 276. Butler, B. F., 337, 342. Butman A. ., 162, 163, 164, L65. Byron, George Gordon, Lord, 15, 23. Cabot, Edward, 9. Cabot, George, 10. Cabot, J. E., 105. Cambridge boyhood, A., 1-37. Cambridge Churchyard, the, 32. Cameron, Mr., 295. Cameron, Mrs. J. M., 284, 295, 296. Campbell, Thomas, 15. Canning, George, 23. Carlyle, Thomas, 77, 272, 278, 279, 280, 285, 296, 304, 332. Carpenter, Mr., 233. Carter, Charles P., 232. Carter family, the, 75. Cary, Alice, 134. Cary, Phoebe, 134. Cayley, Mr., 289. Channing, Barbara, 83, 84. Channing, E. T., 49, 52, 53, 57. Channing, Ellery, 169, 174. Channing, W. F., 159, 160, 176. Channing, W. H., 43, 44, 97, 002, 114, 120, 175, 327. Chapman, George, 95. Chapman, J. J., 190. Charles River the, 96. Chaucer, Geofrey, 92. Cheney, John, 176. Child of the college, A, 38-68. Child, F. J., 52, 53, 336. Child, Mrs., Lydia Maria, 77, 102, 126. Choules, J. O., 175. Christ, Jesus, s18. Church of the Disciples, t
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VII: the free church (search)
hich he never had paid much attention—see what it is to be absorbed in the larger interests of life. To Worcester there came from time to time people whom it was a delight to meet. Last week, wrote Mr. Higginson, Mr. Emerson was here and gave one of his old style of lectures, rich and delicious, he staid here, and I never liked him so much; he had all his invariable gentleness and graciousness. At another time he writes, To-day I have had a tolerably good time. Tea with Alice and Phoebe Cary, the latter a dumpy jolly milkmaid, the former rather fine and superior. Of the actress, Charlotte Cushman, whom Mr. Higginson introduced to a Worcester audience by reading a letter describing her, he wrote to Harriet Prescott:— What a wonder she is! That magnificent vigor and vital heat of hers is enough to redeem her native land forever from the charge of producing sickly and lifeless women. . . . I was careful what I read, but there was one little sentence which described her
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 9: the Western influence (search)
d to their modest front door, about 1850, by two plump and lively maidens who inquired for her son. They were told that he was not at home. They cheerfully announced that they would come in and wait for him; and on being told that he was in Boston and might not return that day, they said that it was of no manner of consequence; they had just arrived from Ohio, were themselves authors, and would come in and remain until he got back. So they came in and waited, and proved to be Alice and Phoebe Cary. They were brought up in an Ohio cabin, had no candles to read by, and so read in the evening by lighted rags in a saucer of lard. Their only books were the Bible, the history of the Jews, Charlotte Temple, and a novel called The black penitents, with the cover gone and the last page all lost, so they never knew what became of the penitents, or whether the people who tore the precious book to pieces had also repented. Their published poems were full of dirges and despair, but they were
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: books for children (search)
entirely free from didacticism and from laboured inanity masquerading as simplicity; it still remains unexcelled in America as a joyous narrative of childhood. Mrs. Hale's Mary had a little Lamb yet gambols in children's hearts—for as inexplicable a reason as much of the mechanical nonsense of Mother Goose. The longevity of jingles has never been an indication of their merit, as witness the permanence of such ditties as Upidee and Good-bye, my Lover, Good-bye. Lucy Larcom and Alice and Phoebe Cary published books of childhood songs; and other women followed with no particular success. Eugene Field See also Book II, Chap. XXIII, and Book III, Chap. IX. and James Whitcomb Riley See also Book III, Chap. X. wrote many tender and charming poems about children, but with some notable exceptions they are as much from the adult point of view as were Longfellow's. The point of view of youthful patriots was skilfully considered in Poems and ballads upon important episodes in Americ
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
ins, 152 Carey, H. C., 173 Carey, Matthew, 368 Carlyle, Thomas, 4, 165, 213, 248, 249, 254, 266 Carmen Triumphale, 307 Carolina, 295, 308 Carpenter, Edward, 263 n. Carpenter, G. R., 53 Carryl, Charles, 408 Cary, Alice, 408 Cary, Phoebe, 408 Cary sisters of Baltimore, 295 Cask of Amontillado, the, 68 Casket, the, 168 Cass, Lewis, 121, 164 Castle by the sea, the, 40 Cassandra Southwick, 48 Castlemon, Harry, 404 Castle nowhere, 381 Catawba wine, 241 CathedCary sisters of Baltimore, 295 Cask of Amontillado, the, 68 Casket, the, 168 Cass, Lewis, 121, 164 Castle by the sea, the, 40 Cassandra Southwick, 48 Castlemon, Harry, 404 Castle nowhere, 381 Catawba wine, 241 Cathedral, the, 247 Causes of the Civil War, the, 142 Centennial hymns, 51 Century, 389 Chaillu, Paul du, 405 Chalmers, George, 107, 108 Chambered Nautilus, the, 237 Channing, Edward T., 164 Channing, W. E., 198, 200, 207, 208 Channing, W. E. (younger), 3, 7, 10, 166 Channing, W. H., 166 Channing family, the, 197 Chant of Defiance, 305 Chaperon, the, 244 Chapman, John, 137 Charcoal sketches or scenes in a metropolis, 152 Charge by the Ford, the, 281 Chariessa, o
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 9: Whittier at home (search)
er son. She explained that he was in Boston. No matter; they would come in and await his return. But he might be away a week. No matter; they would willingly wait that time for such a pleasure. So in they came. They proved to be Alice and Phoebe Cary, whose earlier poems, which had already preceded them, were filled with dirges and despair; but they were the merriest of housemates, and as the poet luckily returned next day, they stayed as long as they pleased, and were welcome. It is h years after, and addressed to that general friend — and occasional enemy — of all literary people, Rufus Wilmot Griswold, of New York:-- Amesbury, 21st June, 1850. My dear fr. Griswold:--I learn from my friend F. W. Kellogg that Alice and Phoebe Cary, of Ohio, are on their way to the East, and would be glad to see them at my place if they come to Boston. Presuming that thou wilt see them in N. Y. I have taken the liberty to invite them, through thee, to call on me. I have been quite ill
1 2