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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 11 1 Browse Search
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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 15: 1847-1850: Aet. 40-43. (search)
the care of a gentleman visiting this country, will, I think, be soon. It is not often that a region so remote and so little known as that which surrounds the great lake of America is visited by a naturalist of the first class. From such a terra incognita, at length unveiled to eyes so discerning, I anticipate strange tidings. I am, my dear sir, with respect and admiration, very truly yours, Hugh Miller. In the spring of 1850 Agassiz married Elizabeth Cabot Cary, daughter of Thomas Graves Cary, of Boston. This marriage confirmed his resolve to remain, at least for the present, in the United States. It connected him by the closest ties with a large family circle, of which he was henceforth a beloved and honored member, and made him the brother-in-law of one of his most intimate friends in Cambridge, Professor C. C. Felton. Thus secure of favorable conditions for the care and education of his children, he called them to this country. His son (then a lad of fifteen years o
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 19: 1860-1863: Aet. 53-56. (search)
ch beset there, by the interruptions to which a man in his position is liable, as in Cambridge. His letters show how constantly during this nominal vacation his Museum and its interests occupied his thoughts. One is to his brother-in-law, Thomas G. Cary, whose residence was in San Francisco, and who had been for years his most efficient aid in obtaining collections from the Pacific Coast. To Mr. Thomas G. Cary. Cambridge, March 23, 1863. dear Tom,—For many years past your aid in fostMr. Thomas G. Cary. Cambridge, March 23, 1863. dear Tom,—For many years past your aid in fostering the plans of the Museum in Cambridge has greatly facilitated the progress of that establishment in everything relating to the Natural History of California, and now that it has become desirable to extend our scheme to objects which have thus far been neglected I make another appeal to you. Every day the history of mankind is brought into more and more intimate connection with the natural history of the animal creation, and it is now indispensable that we should organize an extensive col
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 22: 1868-1871: Aet. 61-64. (search)
a, who arrived in the spring of 1870 to put in final order the collection of Brazilian fishes, and passed two years in this country. Thus Agassiz's hands were doubly strengthened. Beside having the service of the salaried assistants and professors, the Museum received much gratuitous aid. Among the scientific volunteers were numbered for years Francois de Pourtales, Theodore Lyman, James M. Barnard, and Alexander Agassiz, while the business affairs of the institution were undertaken by Thomas G. Cary, Agassiz's brother-in-law. The latter had long been of great service to the Museum as collector on the Pacific coast, where he had made this work his recreation in the leisure hours of a merchant's life. For the history of the Museum in later times reference is made to the regular reports and publications of the institution. Broken as he was in health, it is amazing to see the amount of work done or directed by Agassiz during this convalescent summer of 1870. The letters written
al theory, 307, 309, 311; mentioned by Murchison, 468. Burkhardt, 320, 442, 479, 494, 647. C. Cabot, J. E., 466. Cambridge, 457-459, 461. Cambridge, first mention of, 252. Campanularia, 494. Carlsruhe, Agassiz at, 30, 33. Cary, T. G., 581, 680. Castanea, 660. Charleston, S. C., 491. Charpentier, 231, 261, 358. Chavannes, Professor, 15. Chelius, 30. Chemidium, 709. Chemidium-like sponge, 704. Chiem, lake of, 84. Chilian, valley of, 756. Chironectes p, 175, 409, 624, 639. to his sister Cecile, 55, 79. to his sister Olympe, 163. to his old pupils, 532. to Elie de Beaumont, 446. to Bonaparte, Prince of Ca-nino, 356, 362, 377, 378. to A. Braun, 33, 36, 41, 118. to Dr. Buckland, 234. to T. G. Cary, 582. to James D. Dana, 451, 493, 509, 519. to L. Coulon, 190, 197. to Decaisne, 432. to A. de la Rive, 663. to Sir P. Egerton, 284, 294, 811, 347, 359, 374, 577, 646; Agassiz to R. W. Emerson, 619. to Chancellor Favargez, 430. to S.