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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
ement. He declared his entire concurrence with the views of the American Anti-Slavery Society, with the single exception of a doubt which rested on his mind as to the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia. We quote from the concluding paragraph of this article:— We assert without hesitation, that, if we possessed the right, we should not scruple to exercise it for the speedy annihilation of servitude and chains. The impression made in boyhood by the glorious exclamation of Cato, A day, an hour, of virtuous liberty Is worth a whole eternity of bondage! has been worn deeper, not effaced, by time; and we eagerly and ardently trust that the day will yet arrive when the clank of the bondman's fetters will form no part of the multitudinous Sounds which our country sends up to Heaven, mingling, as it were, into a song of praise for our national prosperity. We yearn with strong desire for the day when freedom shall no longer wave Her fustian flag in mockery over s