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were already within 200 or 300 yards of the position where he was encamped with the Second Brigade of his division, consisting of about 1,200 mounted men under Col. Cawthorn. A second messenger came immediately afterward from Gen. Rains to announce that the main body of the enemy was upon him, but that he would endeavor to hold hiembracing infantry, and artillery, 1,306 strong, lost not only their commander, but thirty-four others killed and 111 wounded. The Second brigade, mounted men, Col. Cawthorn commanding, about 1,200 strong, lost twenty-one killed and seventy-five wounded. Col. Cawthorn was himself wounded. Major Charles Rogers, of St. Louis, adjutaCol. Cawthorn was himself wounded. Major Charles Rogers, of St. Louis, adjutant of the brigade, was mortally wounded, and died the day after the battle. He was a gallant officer, and at all times vigilant and attentive to his duties, and fearless upon the field of battle. Your Excellency will perceive that our State forces consisted of only 5,221 officers and men; that of these no less than 156 died upo
were already within 200 or 300 yards of the position where he was encamped with the Second Brigade of his division, consisting of about 1,200 mounted men under Col. Cawthorn. A second messenger came immediately afterward from Gen. Rains to announce that the main body of the enemy was upon him, but that he would endeavor to hold hiembracing infantry, and artillery, 1,306 strong, lost not only their commander, but thirty-four others killed and 111 wounded. The Second brigade, mounted men, Col. Cawthorn commanding, about 1,200 strong, lost twenty-one killed and seventy-five wounded. Col. Cawthorn was himself wounded. Major Charles Rogers, of St. Louis, adjutaCol. Cawthorn was himself wounded. Major Charles Rogers, of St. Louis, adjutant of the brigade, was mortally wounded, and died the day after the battle. He was a gallant officer, and at all times vigilant and attentive to his duties, and fearless upon the field of battle. Your Excellency will perceive that our State forces consisted of only 5,221 officers and men; that of these no less than 156 died upo