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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Chaffin or search for Chaffin in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
d and 18 wounded; 110 men killed and 204 wounded; 14 officers and 337 men missing; total, 698. This was the main part of the Confederate loss. The Federal return of losses was 4,400. Grant's demonstrations north of the James, on the old Seven Days battle ground, to draw Lee's forces away from the vicinity of the mine explosion, had caused Bratton's brigade to be sent across at Drewry's bluff to Fussell's mill on the 29th, and thence to New Market heights. Kershaw had taken position at Chaffin's bluff several days before, and on the 28th, Conner's (Kershaw's) and Lane's brigades attempted to dislodge the enemy from the Long Bridge road, causing a severe fight. Heth's, Field's and Kershaw's divisions were massed here; the enemy abandoned the advanced position and Kershaw recrossed the James on the 30th. On July 27th, Hampton was ordered from Drewry's to intercept Wilson's cavalry expedition, returning from Staunton river bridge to Grant's army. He attacked at Sappony church,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
and the Fifth regiment and Second rifles were sent down to recover that position, a work in which they most effectively assisted. Of this movement Col. R. E. Bowen writes: The regiment marched fully one mile under a continuous fire of shell, grape, canister and minie balls, without losing a single man-one of the most remarkable events of the war. Meanwhile Bratton's thin line repulsed assaults near the Libby house. In the afternoon Bratton took command of the whole line from his left to Chaffin's farm, and by the second day had recovered all that had been lost. General Lee's report of August 21st reads: The enemy abandoned last evening his position north of James river and returned to the south side. This morning General Hill attacked his position on the Weldon railroad, and drove him from his advanced lines to his main intrenchments, from which he was not dislodged. Over 300 prisoners, exclusive of wounded, were captured. Our loss was principally in Hagood's brigade, wh
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
nd the fight between the Merrimac and Monitor. In June, 1862, he was appointed major of artillery in the provisional army of the Confederate States and assigned to duty as commander of the Eighteenth Virginia battalion of heavy artillery in the defenses of Richmond. He continued in this capacity, being in charge of a considerable portion of the line, until the evacuation of Richmond, and while in this service, in the fall of 1864, he was sent to Fort Harrison, to take command of troops at Chaffin's farm, in the place of Maj. Dick Taylor, who had been captured. While here he was wounded in the left arm. He had received one wound prior to this in the Kilpatrick raid. When the evacuation of Richmond became a certainty, his battalion was placed in Crutchfield's brigade, Custis Lee's division, for the retreat, and in an effort to reach Gen. Robert E. Lee's army they were overtaken by the enemy at Sailor's creek, where a desperate battle ensued, in which General Crutchfield was killed a