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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
Perley and Asa Kimball in their progress, on the Contrary to Encourage and Assist them, as they would merit the Esteem of all Lovers of their Country's Liberty and the thanks of this Committee. The Inhabitants of the County of Sunbury in the province of Nova Scotia being regularly assembled at the Meeting house in Maugervile in said County on Tuesday the 14 day of May 1776 to Consult on some measures necessary to be taken for the safety of the Inhabitants. 1. Chose Jacob Barker Esq'r Chairman. 2. Chose Jacob Barker, Israel Perley, Phin's Nevers, Esq'rs and Messrs. Daniel Palmer, Moses Pickard, Edward Coye, Tho's Hartt, Israel Kenney, Asa Kimball, Asa Perley, Oliver Perley, and Hugh Quinton a Committee to prepare a Draught proper for the Proceedings of the Assembly. The meeting then adjourned till three of the clock in the afternoon. Being again met the Committee Reported the following Resolves, which were read and after a second Reading the Resolves were passed in the aff
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
1833 (Ms.), just finished reading thy speech at the Exeter Hall meeting. It is full of high and manly truth—terrible in its rebuke, but full of justice. The opening, as a specimen of beautiful composition, I have rarely seen excelled. Mr. Chairman—It is long since I sacrificed all my national, Lib. 3.178. complexional and local prejudices upon the altar of Christian love, and, breaking down the narrow boundaries of a selfish patriotism, inscribed upon my banner this motto: My countryery. The last of the long array of charges next brought against the Colonization Society was its denial that the free blacks could ever be elevated; which opened the way for the following vindication from their champion in Exeter Hall: Mr. Chairman, my soul sickens in turning over these Lib. 3.179. masses of moral corruption, and I hasten to a close. I cannot boast, like Mr. Cresson, of defraying my own expenses; for he is opulent, and I am poor. All that I have is dedicated to this