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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Winthrop Chanler or search for Winthrop Chanler in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
at the old Boston Music Hall, he appeared in a black velvet court suit with ruffles, and black silk stockings, his hair long and curling on his shoulders. A few moments after he had taken his place on the platform, a string of Harvard students filed into the hall, dressed in caricature of the lecturer's costume, each with a sunflower in his coat and a peacock feather in his hand. Our mother, who was in the audience, recognized near the head of the procession her favorite grand-nephew, Winthrop Chanler. Wilde took this interruption in good part, welcoming the lads and turning the laugh against them. Imitation is the sincerest flattery, he said, though this is a case where I might say, Save me from my friends. Wilde came several times to the house in Boston; later Uncle Sam brought him to spend a day or two at Oak Glen, where the household was thrown into a flutter by the advent of his valet. It was one thing to entertain the aesthete, another to put up the gentleman's gentleman.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
pronounced out of danger.... Latterly we have heard of him as feeble, and have felt renewed anxiety, but were entirely unprepared for his death. May 20. Dark days of nothingness these, to-day and yesterday. Nothing to do but be patient and explore the past. May 21. Had a sitting all alone with dear Uncle Sam's picture this afternoon. I thought it might be the time of his funeral. I read the beautiful 90th Psalm and a number of his bright, sweet lyrics. A sympathetic visit from Winthrop Chanler. May 27. .... Dear Brother Sam's death has brought me well in sight of the farther shore. May I be ready when it is my turn to cross. To her sister Louisa Dearest Sister, I was already in debt to you for one good letter when this later one arrived, giving me the full, desired particulars of our dear one's last days on earth. You and Annie both write as though the loss were heaviest to me, and I only feel that I cannot feel it half enough. The pathos of a life of such wonder
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
r at half-past 4, supper at halfpast seven in the evening reading aloud and conversation. I am miserable with pain, probably rheumatic, in my left hip. Think I must have got a chill on the Rhine boat. I say nothing about this. Daisy and Wintie [Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop Chanler] came this afternoon. August 7. To Anglican service with my dear sister. A dull sermon. The service indifferently read — just the stereotyped Church of England article. My dreadful hip joint does not ache to-day, anMrs. Winthrop Chanler] came this afternoon. August 7. To Anglican service with my dear sister. A dull sermon. The service indifferently read — just the stereotyped Church of England article. My dreadful hip joint does not ache to-day, and I am ready to skip about with joy at the relief even if it prove but temporary. The pain has been pretty severe and I have said nought about it, fearing treatment. August 9. Read Aristotle, as I have done all these days. Took up St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans, with a more distinct view than heretofore of his attitude relative to them, and theirs to him. Walked out with my sister, and saw at the bric-a-brac booth near the Stahlbrunnen a ring composed of a fine garnet, set with fine diam
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
hat the dimness of sight, which has lately troubled me, might disappear. My eyes are really better to-day. I seemed at one moment during the service to see myself as a little child in the Heavenly Father's Nursery, having played my naughty pranks (alas!) and left my tasks unperformed, but coming, as bedtime draws near, to kiss and be forgiven. To Maud Rokeby, Barrytown, N. Y., December 25, 1896. My own dearest, I am here according to promise to spend Christmas with Daisy. Mrs. Winthrop Chanler. I occupy Elizabeth Chanler's room, beautifully adorned with hangings of poppy-colored silk. . . . All of us helped to dress the tree, which was really beautiful. The farm people came in at about six o'clock, also the old tutor, Bostwick, and the Armstrong cousins. After dinner, we had a fiddler in the hall. Alida danced an Irish jig very prettily, and we had a Virginia reel, which I danced, if you please, with Mr. Bostwick. Then we snuggled up to the fire in the library and Wi
Chamounix, II, 20. Chanler, Alida, II, 225. Chandler, Margaret, see Aldrich, Mrs. Richard. Chanler, Margaret Terry, II, 55, 57, 60, 65, 67, 174, 176, 202, 220, 224, 240, 243, 244, 253, 254, 303. Chanler, T. W., II, 303, 304. Chanler, Winthrop, II, 72, 94, 174, 225, 243, 303. Channing, Eva, I, 208. Channing, W. E., I, 70, 72, 200; II, 56, 57, 77, 108, 142. Channing, W. H., I, 286; II, 57, 194. Chamning Memorial Church, II, 78. Chapman, Elizabeth, II, 215, 224, 289. n, Alfred, Lord, I, 160; II, 203, 227, 247. Terry, Louisa, I, 267, 268, 352; II, 12-14, 16, 28, 29, 32, 55, 60, 65, 67, 172-75, 235, 236, 238, 256. Letter to, II, 94. Terry, Luther, I, 95; II, 28, 55, 67, 247, 254. Terry, Margaret,, see Chanler. Tewfik Pasha, II, 36. Thackeray, W. M., II, 306. Thaxter, Celia, II, 199. Thayer, Adele, II, 312. Thayer, W. R., II, 346. Theseum, I, 275. Thorndike, Mrs., II, 247. Thucydides, II, 47, 98. Thynne, Lady, Beatrice, II,