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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 109 1 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 84 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 33 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 23 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 17 3 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Channing, William Ellery 1780-1842 (search)
Channing, William Ellery 1780-1842 Clergyman; born in Newport, R. I., April 7, 1780; graduated at Harvard in 1798 with highest honors; was a teacher in a private family in Richmond, Va., for a year afterwards; and, returning in feeble health in 1802, studied theology, and became pastor of the Federal Street Church in Boston, hrough his laborious life he suffered from ill-health. In 1822 he sought physical improvement by a voyage to Europe, and in 1830 he went to St. Croix, William Ellery Channing W. I., for the same purpose. With a colleague he occasionally officiated in the pulpit until 1840, when he resigned. In August, 1842, he delivered his lcolleague he occasionally officiated in the pulpit until 1840, when he resigned. In August, 1842, he delivered his last public address at Lenox, Mass., in commemoration of the abolition of slavery in the West Indies. Mr. Channing contributed much towards stimulating anti-slavery feeling. He died in Bennington, Vt., Oct. 2, 1842.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dix, Dorothea Lynde, 1794-1887 (search)
ed herself by teaching a school for young girls in Boston. Becoming interested in the welfare of the convicts in the State prison at Charlestown, her philanthropic spirit expanded and embraced all of the unfortunate and suffering classes. Having inherited from a relative property sufficient to render her independent, she went to Europe for her health. Returning to Boston in 1837, she devoted her life to the investigation and alleviation of the condition of paupers, lunatics, and prisoners, encouraged by her friend and pastor, Dr. Channing. In this work she visited every State in the Union east of the Rocky Mountains, endeavoring to persuade legislatures to aid the unfortunate, and was instrumental in bringing about the foundation of several State asylums for the insane. At the breaking out of the Civil War she was appointed superintendent of hospital nurses, and after the close of the war she resumed her efforts in behalf of the insane. She died in Trenton, N. J., July 19, 1887.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall of fame, (search)
tober, 1900, a jury of 100 persons was appointed to invite and pass upon nominations for the first fifty names. The number of names submitted reached 252, of which twenty-nine received fifty-one (the minimum) or more votes. These were, therefore, declared eligible The following are the names, with the number of votes, which were accepted. The remaining twenty-one are to be selected in 1902: George Washington, 97; Abraham Lincoln, 96; Daniel Webster, 96; Benjamin Franklin, 94; Ulysses S. Grant, 92; John Marshall, 91; Thomas Jefferson, 90; Ralph Waldo Emerson, 87; Henry W. Longfellow, 85; Robert Fulton, 85; Washington Irving, 83; Jonathan Edwards, 81; Samuel F. B. Morse, 80; David G. Farragut, 79; Henry Clay, 74; Nathaniel Hawthorne, 73; George Peabody, 72; Robert E. Lee, 69; Peter Cooper, 69; Eli Whit ney, 67; John J. Audubon, 67; Horace Mann, 66; Henry Ward Beecher, 66; James Kent, 65; Joseph Story, 64; John Adams, 61; William E. Channing, 58; Gilbert Stuart, 52; Asa Gray, 51.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Unitarians, (search)
Unitarians, Frequently termed Socinians from Laelius Socinus, who founded a sect in Italy about 1546. In America Dr. James Freeman, of King's Chapel, Boston, in 1783, removed from the Prayer book of common prayers all reference to the Trinity or Deity and worship of Christ; his church became distinctly Unitarian in 1787. In 1801 the Plymouth Church declared itself Unitarian. Dr. William Ellery Channing (1780-1842) was the acknowledged head of this church until his death. The American Unitarian association was formed May 24, 1825; headquarters at Boston, Mass. The Western conference organized 1852, and a national Unitarian conference at New York City, April 5, 1865. Reports for 1900 showed: 550 ministers, 459 churches, and 71,000 members.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ratified by the Senate, 39 to 9......Aug. 20, 1842 Beginning of the fiscal year changed from Jan. 1 to July 1 by law of......Aug. 28, 1842 After vetoing two tariff bills, President Tyler signs the third......Aug. 30, 1842 [The prevailing rate of this tariff was 20 per cent.] Second session adjourns......Aug. 31, 1842 [It passed ninety-five acts, thirteen joint resolutions, and 189 private bills, sitting 269 days—the longest session since the beginning of Congress.] William Ellery Channing, Unitarian minister, dies at Bennington, Vt., aged sixty-two......Oct. 2, 1842 Alexander Slidell Mackenzie, commanding the United States brig Somers, while on a short cruise, hangs at the yard-arm Philip Spencer, a midshipman and son of John C. Spencer, then Secretary of War; Samuel Cromwell, a boatswain's mate; and Elijah H. Small, for an alleged conspiracy......Dec. 1, 1842 Third session assembles......Dec. 5, 1842 Samuel Woodworth (author of the Old oaken bucket) dies at
s, and commemorates the names, of his illustrious friends, John Pickering, Joseph Story, Washington Allston, and William Ellery Channing, each of whom had but recently finished his career. This oration abounds with singular affluence of illustratiomory, but the long life, of the kindred spirit who has this day embalmed them all. In characterizing the eloquence of Channing, the orator unconsciously described himself: His eloquence had not the character and fashion of forensic efforts or parl, ascend above the present in place and time. Like Allston, regard fame only as the eternal shadow of excellence. Like Channing, bend in adoration of the right. Cultivate alike the wisdom of experience, and the wisdom of hope. Mindful of the futudid me good to read it. I like it, like it all, all over and all through. I like especially what you say of Allston and Channing. That sounds like the Christianity of the nineteenth century, the application of religion to life. You have said a str
anks and tariffs which are to occupy the foremost place in our discussions, and to give their tone, sounding always with the chink of dollars and cents, to the policy of the country. Henceforward protection to man shall be the true American system. . . . The old and ill-compacted party organizations are broken: from their ruins is now formed a new party,--The Party of Freedom. There are good men who longed for this, and have died without the sight. John Quincy Adams longed for it. William Ellery Channing longed for it. Their spirits hover over us, and urge us to persevere. Let us be true to the moral grandeur of our cause. Have faith in truth, and in God who giveth the victory. Oh! a fair cause stands firm and will abide: Legions of angels fight upon its side. It is said that we have but one idea. This I deny; but, admitting that it is so, are we not, with our one idea, better than a party with no ideas at all? And what is our one idea? It is the idea which combined our fa
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 2: old Cambridge in three literary epochs (search)
later writers in the Dial, Christopher Pearce Cranch, who wrote much in it, was in his later life a resident of Cambridge; that Lowell contributed several sonnets to the second volume; that William Henry Channing, who wrote the serial Ernest the Seeker, from time to time resided in Cambridge, where his mother dwelt permanently, being much of the time an occupant of the house now known as Fay House and the headquarters of Radcliffe College. It is also to be noticed that his cousin, William Ellery Channing, furnished for the last volume of the Dial a series of papers called Youth of the poet and the Painter, the scene of which was in part laid at Harvard College. It will thus be seen at what a variety of points the Dial touched Old Cambridge. 2. the Atlantic Monthly I know of no book or essay in which the history of the Atlantic Monthly is carried far enough back. Even the best of these narratives, that of Mr. J. T. Trowbridge in the Atlantic Monthly for January, 1895, entit
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
ns, Anthony, 177. Burroughs, Stephen, 30. Byron, Lord, 46. Cabot, J. E., 68. Carey & Lea, publishers, 118. Carlyle, Thomas, 53, 140. Carter, Robert, 46, 47, 67, 69. Channing, Prof. E. T., 14, 15, 44. Channing, Prof., Edward, 15. Channing, Rev. W. E., 116. Channing, W. E., (of Concord), 58, 64. Channing, W. H., 15, 57, 64, 104, 167. Channing, Dr., Walter, 84. Chateaubriand, Vicomte, 191. Chatterton, Thomas, 114. Chauncey, Pres., Charles, 7, 8, 9. Cheever, Rev. G. B., 94, 113. Channing, W. E., (of Concord), 58, 64. Channing, W. H., 15, 57, 64, 104, 167. Channing, Dr., Walter, 84. Chateaubriand, Vicomte, 191. Chatterton, Thomas, 114. Chauncey, Pres., Charles, 7, 8, 9. Cheever, Rev. G. B., 94, 113. Cheney, S. W., 169, 170. Chester, Capt., John, 20. Child, F. J., 183. Clarke, Rev. J. F., 57, 104. Cleveland, Pres., Grover, 195. Cleveland, H. R., 123. Cogswell, J. G., 14, 27, 116, 117. Coleridge, S. T., 38, 91, 95. Collamer, Jacob, 161. Cooper, J. F., 35. Craigie, Mrs., 124, 129. Cranch, C. P., 58, 64, 70. Crichton, the Admirable, 155. Curtis, G. T., 16. Cuvier, Baron, 35. Dana, Francis, 15. Dana, R. H., 14, 15. Dana, R. H., Jr., 15, 191. Dana, Richard, 15. Danforth,
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 2: the Background (search)
hy they were so startled by Garrison. Even Channing, who was a true saint, and, when time was givAbolitionists on the question of free speech, Channing became a broken idol to all of the South and contemporary flock of time-serving parsons. Channing was a man who could, and did, go through the ation, and knew not how to save himself. Dr. Channing's coldness toward Abolition might be shown -beloved of all. He was an especial friend of Channing's. His tragic death was at the time considerenning for permission to use his church; which Channing accorded. The standing committee of the churhan accept this affront from his flock. Nay, Channing should have resigned twenty years earlier, anl are the philosophic illuminations of men. Dr. Channing disbelieved in the principle of associationf association. I share this disbelief with Dr. Channing; the miserable squabbles between Anti-slave which dangers Channing very clearly saw. Yet Channing was himself the servant of an association; an[9 more...]
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