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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
ainst the people of color are active and inveterate. His notions of justice and pleas of expediency are utterly abhorrent to our moral sense. He persisted in saying that the condition of the slaves was better than that of the laboring classes in Great Britain!!— an assertion which makes his own countrymen a servile and brutish race, and which any man who knows the difference between black and white should blush to advance. Carey, it will be remembered, was a native of Ireland. Compare Dr. Channing's letter to Miss Aikin of Dec. 29, 1831 (p. 113 of Correspondence ): But do you know how slaveholders reconcile themselves to their guilt? . . . Our slaves subsist more comfortably than the populace and peasantry of Europe. . . . I acknowledge the sophistry, but mourn that it should have so much foundation. Notice also that Mathew Carey had published in 1796 St. George Tucker's Dissertation on Slavery; with a Proposal for the Gradual Abolition of it in the State of Virginia, bearing this
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
tantly been struck with admiration to think that so small a body could contain so large a mind! We realized the truth of Watts's spiritual phrenology, if we may so term it, (and Watts, like the apostle Paul, was weak and contemptible in his bodily appearance,) as set forth in the following verse: Were I so tall to reach the pole, Or grasp the ocean with my span, I must be measured by my soul: The mind's the standard of the man. Wilberforce was as frail and slender in his figure as is Dr. Channing, and lower in stature than even Benjamin Lundy, the Clarkson of our country. His head hung droopingly upon his breast, so as to require an effort of the body to raise it when he spoke, and his back had an appearance of crookedness: hence, in walking, he looked exceedingly diminutive. In his earlier years he was probably erect and agile; but feeble health, long continued, had thus marred his person in the vale of time. At his kind invitation we took breakfast with him and his interes
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
ust hesitate to pronounce it ill-advised, whether Mr. Garrison's object was to cement the philanthropic English alliance, to shame his country anew, George Ticknor writes to William H. Prescott from Dresden, Feb. 8, 1836: Your remarks about Dr. Channing's book on Slavery bring up the whole subject afresh before me. You cannot think how difficult and often how disagreeable a matter it is to an American travelling in Europe, to answer all the questions that are put to him about it, and hear allas in the case of Dr. Gannett. It Lib. 4.165, 47. was perhaps at his instigation that Mr. Garrison addressed the following stirring appeal to the greatest light of the Unitarian world, the Rev. Dr. Channing: W. L. Garrison to William Ellery Channing. Boston, January 20, 1834. Ms. in possession of Dr. W. F. Channing, Providence, R. I. Rev. And dear sir: I have taken the liberty to send you a few anti-slavery publications, the perusal of which, by you, I shall esteem a noble re
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 1: the Puritan writers (search)
at he influenced later American writing, good or bad. The situation is very different with Anne Bradstreet, who, indeed, represents a second step toward a type of writing which should be in some sense American in quality as well as in birthplace. Though born in England, she became absolutely identified with American thought and life, exerted an immense influence in her day, and was the ancestor of five especially intellectual families in New England, counting among her descendants William Ellery Channing, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Richard Henry Dana, Wendell Phillips, and Andrews Norton. She was born in 1612 of Puritan stock, her father being steward of the estates of the Puritan nobleman, the Earl of Lincoln. She was married at sixteen and came to America with her husband, Governor Bradstreet, in 1630. It is evident that, in spite of her Puritan sense of duty, she could not leave England for the raw life of the colonies without a pang. After a time, she wrote many years later, I c
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 5: the New England period — Preliminary (search)
may be set, perhaps, at the year (1830) when Webster and Channing were at the height of their reputation; when Webster's Reply to Hayne was delivered, and Channing was just entering upon that career of social and political reform which gave him bo or Canton. This was, externally speaking, the Boston of Channing and of Webster. The fact has been already noted that ie best of his work some security of permanence. William Ellery Channing. The first American clergyman, after Jonathan E literary hold upon the English-speaking world was William Ellery Channing, who must not be confused with his son and two nepd intellectual activity. The hold taken at one time by Dr. Channing is seen in the fact that six different reprints of his ers in a single year. During his whole life, it is said, Channing never knew a day of unimpaired health, yet during that liofound or independent thought, a selection of maxims from Channing would be scarcely inferior to one from Emerson. The litt
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
itor of The New York Review. A year later he became assistant editor of The New York evening post, and in 1829 assumed the editorship. This responsible position he held till his death, which occurred in New York City, June 12, 1878. Channing, William Ellery He was born at Newport, R. I., April 7, 1780. Here his boyhood was passed, and here he received his first strong religious impressions. Graduating from Harvard, he became an instructor in a family in Richmond, Va., where he acquiredare a letter on The slavery question (1839); a tract on Emancipation (1840); and an argument (1842) on The duty of the free States, touching the case of the slaves on board the brig Creole. He died at Bennington, Vt., Oct. 2, 1842. Channing, William Ellery 2d Nephew of the foregoing, and son of Walter Channing, M. D. Born in Boston. Entered Harvard in Lowell's class (1838), but did not graduate. He lived for most of his life in Concord, Mass. He published two volumes of poems, in 1843
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
5: New England period — Preliminary (A) G. T. Curtis's Life of Daniel Webster, 2 vols., D. Appleton & Co., 1869-1870. W. H. Channing's Memoirs of William Ellery Channing, 3 vols., Crosby and Nichols, 1848. H. B. Adams's Life and writings of Jared Sparks, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1893. George Ticknor's Life of William & Reed, 1863. Mrs. J. T. Fields's Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1897. (B) Webster's Works, 6 vols., Little & Brown, 1851. Channing's Works, 1 vol., American Unitarian Association, 1886. Prescott's History of the conquest of Mexico, 3 vols., New York, 1843. Parkman's Works, 12 vols., LiBuccaneer. 1826. Longfellow's Poems. 1827. Fitz-Greene Halleck's Poems. 1827. Miss Sedgwick's Hope Leslie. 1827. N. P. Willis's Sketches. 1830. W. E. Channing's Discourses, reviews, and Miscellanies. 1831. Whittier's Legends of New England. 1833. Poe's Ms. Found in a Bottle. 1835. Drake's The Culprit Fay an
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
Cantata, Lanier's, 224. Carlyle, Thomas, 169, 170, 179, 260, 282. Cary, Alice and Phoebe, 241. Chambered Nautilus, Holmes's, 159, 163, 264. Channing, William Ellery, 10, 110, 111, 114-116, 183, 192. Channing, William Ellery, the younger, 177, 264. Chanting the Square Deific, Whitman's, 232. Charlotte Temple, Channing, William Ellery, the younger, 177, 264. Chanting the Square Deific, Whitman's, 232. Charlotte Temple, Mrs. Rowson's, 92, 241. Chasles, M. Philarete, 244. Chastellux, Marquis de, 54. Chatham, Lord, 44, 45. Child, Lydia Maria, 125, 126. Choate, Rufus, 112. Christabel, Coleridge's, 219. Christianus per Ignem, Mather's, 17. Christus: a Miystery, Longfellow's, 144. Clara Howard, Brown's, 70. Clarissa Harlowe, Richar. Scott, Sir, Walter, 36, 85, 90, 93, 96, 97, 98, 187, 259, 269, 274, 275, 277. Scudder, Horace E., 134. Sedgwick, Catharine Maria, 126, 148. Self-culture, Channing's, 114. Serene I Fold my hands, Burroughs's, 264. Seven Pines, Battle of, 217. Sewall, Samuel, 27-35. Seward, Miss, Anna, 75, 259. Shakespeare, 1, 108
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 10: Thoreau (search)
e and philosophy. Besides, he was well seen in the English classics from Chaucer downwards. A few pages of A Week yield quotations from Emerson, Ovid, Quarles, Channing, Relations des Jesuits, Gower, Lydgate, Virgil, Tennyson, Percy's Reliques, Byron, Milton, Shakespeare, Spenser, Simonides. As Lowell remarks, His literature wa daily, as the plant puts forth leaves. It only remained to choose his recess. Apparently the suggestion as to the particular recess came from his friend, Channing, who writes, I see nothing for you in this earth but that field which I once christened Briars; go out upon that, build yourself a hut, and there begin the such true pictures of reality, how gladly would the modern reader forego the disquisitions on Persius and Ossian. The next year, 1850, Thoreau and his friend Channing made a brief raid across the border into Quebec, though the record of his experience was not published until 1866, with the title A Yankee in Canada. Stevenson f
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
to live, but I do not wish to be its life. Neither do I like to put it into the hands of the Humanity and Reform Men, because they trample on letters and poetry; nor in the hands of the scholars, for they are dead and dry. After spending much time and some money Emerson too felt forced to abandon the undertaking, and The Dial came to an end with the close of the fourth volume. Among contributors other than those already noted were C. P. Cranch, George Ripley, William H. Channing, William Ellery Channing, Theodore Parker, James Freeman Clarke, James Russell Lowell, Charles A. Dana, and Jones Very. In its own day The Dial was regarded reverently by a few, but by the great mass of readers it was ignored or taken as a joke. A later generation still finds many things in its pages amusing but has come to recognize it as the best single exponent of New England Transcendentalism, and of the peculiar aspects of culture that accompanied that movement. See also Book II, Chap. VIII.
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