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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 109 1 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 84 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 33 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 23 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for William Ellery Channing or search for William Ellery Channing in all documents.

Your search returned 55 results in 6 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
papers and from several pulpits, including Dr. Channing's, in which the Rev. Henry Ware, Jr., happeeading the notice caused great commotion in Dr. Channing's congregation (Lib. 5.166), and in the new the earnest remonstrances of their pastor, Dr. Channing, and under the condemnation of all their frti-Slavery Society, though she has taken up Dr. Channing's notion (a mistaken one, I think) of the ses. Well, it is announced that the great Dr. Channing has published his thoughts upon the subjecttal host of God's elect? . . . I have read Channing's work. It abounds with useful truisms expre. Thou murderer Lynch, avaunt! . . . Rev. Dr. Channing has just published a sort of Ishmaelitisno better consolation. A sharp Review of Dr. Channing's book has just appeared, Remarks on DrDr. Channing's slavery. Two editions were sold within a fortnight (Lib. 6.3). It was reviewed in turn The Rev. Ezra Stiles Gannett, colleague of Dr. Channing. in Boston, when a note was brought in whic[7 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
I have almost grown tired in waiting for a copy of Channing's second edition. If it should not come next weekething of my anxiety respecting its remarks upon Dr. Channing's work: let there be an impartial mixture of prappan, or Samuel H. Cox, or Gerrit Smith, or William Ellery Channing—for the sake of preserving or enlarging my given have foreshadowed Mr. Garrison's judgment of Channing's essay on slavery as ultimately recorded in a for he answered some taunts of Tracy's Recorder about Channing's censure of the abolitionists and of Thompson by rsonally aggrieved, Ms. Feb. 25, 1836. and that Dr. Channing had helped himself freely to the ideas containeas general. As for his impulse to write at all, Dr. Channing told Mrs. Child in 1833 that the reading of her mob of October 21 that he was heartily engaged in Channing's Life, p. 537. writing on the subject of slavery.ess the first week in November, 1835 ( Life of W. E. Channing, Centenary Memorial edition, p. 537). Mrs. Chil
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
o say that the signal for this was given by Dr. Channing, for it proceeded from a very different caThis petition of 100 citizens was headed by Dr. Channing (Lib. 7.195). After a spirited appeal from but, happily, all went off pretty quietly. Dr. Channing made some excellent introductory remarks. Several excellent resolutions, drawn up by Dr. Channing, passed with unexpected unanimity. The triectern, in the body of the hall, from which Dr. Channing read his resolutions. See Mrs. Chapman's gother civilized countries. It remained for Dr. Channing once more to confound moral distinctions anited above. But the Ante, p. 190. moment Dr. Channing declared that the fact of Lovejoy's having by accident related to slavery, and which Dr. Channing (in his public capacity) insisted on reviewx to his letter to the citizens of Boston. Dr. Channing was not yet qualified to instruct abolition06. by some fatal moral cross-readings from Dr. Channing's incoherent and contradictory utterances o[3 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
er, does bear upon the charge of fanaticism already brought by Elizur Wright against Mr. Garrison. No one has accused Dr. Channing of being a fanatic because he gave the initial Atlantic Monthly, Oct., 1883, p. 534. impulse to the Brook Farm experiose zeal in a particular cause is not tempered by extensive sympathies and universal love. Compare Pollen's letter to Channing, Jan. 12, 1837, commending the Grimkes, who devote themselves entirely to the great work of universal emancipation. . . t Unitarian clergymen at the Odeon—the redeemed Federal-Street Theatre. Henry Ware, Jr., began the course in January; Dr. Channing and Samuel Lib. 8.15, 27. J. May followed in February. In April, the New York Peace Society issued a call for a reprcaught up and hurried along; rather, he chafed under the logical shortcomings of the special champions of the doctrine. Channing, who, while inclined to Lib. 8.158. interpret literally the injunctions of Scripture thereupon, could not reconcile th
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
now having abandoned moral suasion for the ballot-box, with the bayonet as their next resource, and held up the old bogey of disunion and civil war. Against such a consummation he invoked the interposition of the clergy, drawing out a reply from Channing characterized by his usual blowing hot and cold (Lib. 9: 57, 61). Mr. Garrison said of it: It separates the subject from personalities—i. e., it shoots at nothing, and hits it. To me, says Dr. Channing, the slaveholder is very much an abstractioDr. Channing, the slaveholder is very much an abstraction. No doubt of it: the Dr. is safe from the thumb-screw, the cart-whip, and the brandingiron. . . . To the slave, the slaveholder is very much a reality-a dreadful reality (Lib. 9.59). Clay's speech was printed in full in the Liberator (9: 26). One sentence of it was destined to be reproduced many times against the author. To the moralist who objected that man could not hold property in man, Clay asserted—That is property which the law declares to be property. This aphorism might fitly have f
peech on Pinckney resolutions, 81; criticises Channing's Essay, 91; opposes Texas, 196, with help ofsecution of Cheever, 1.478, 2.64, 68; reviews Channing's Essay, 68; condemns Lovejoy, 185, 188, 189. 521, to Boston, 2.38; reports G.'s review of Channing, 91; at stable meeting of Mass. A. S. S., 12odges with him, 69, with Knapp, 96, 98; hears Channing preach, 98; failing health, 120, death, 121; troyed, 2.77, personal peril, 93; letter from Channing, 98, tribute to G., 122, 132, disclaims ChannChanning's compliments, 132; censures G. for course towards Clerical Appeal, 166; visits J. Q. Adams, 196, Charles J., 1.56. Brook Farm, suggested by Channing, 2.205, founded by G. Ripley, 421. Brooks, Elizabeth M. [d. 1834], 1.145. Channing, William Ellery, Rev. [1780-1842], his person, 1.357, un Bradburn, 2.354; J. T. Buckingham, 1.179; W. E. Channing, 1.24, 464; M. W. Chapman, 2.360, 362; J. 2.258, doctrinal timidity, 224.—See, also, W. E. Channing, R. W. Emerson, C. Follen, E. S. Gannett,