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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 60 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 36 14 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 27 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 20 2 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 11 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for William Henry Channing or search for William Henry Channing in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 9 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
espotism. But the ranks of the disorganizers were swelled by the followers of Channing, whose dread of Lib. 15.29; ante, 2.56. organization was most acute, and beli abolition societies had cost him the public ear on the subject of slavery. Dr. Channing himself, said the Unitarian Monthly Miscellany, has not a tithe of the influmass (Lib. 11: 69). Mrs. Child, on the contrary, asserted in the Standard that Channing had intended to preach a sermon on slavery after his return from the West Indi of Brook Farm, as it was henceforth to be known, notoriously proceeded from Dr. Channing. In his recent work on West India Emancipation he had even professed to seem and denominationalism, the need of it cannot be doubted for the year 1841. Dr. Channing, in his work on West India Emancipation, sorrowfully admitted the Lib. 11.679. of his columns for Liberty Party notices and reports. He still held, with Channing, that, by such a conversion of Lib. 11.1. their anti-slavery energies, abolit
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
rt of the Government's right to demand from the whole human race respect to the municipal law of Southern slavery—to use Channing's words in review of Webster, in his pamphlet on the Duty of the Free States (Lib. 12: 55, 57, 61, 65, 105). In the Senom sustaining slavery, as well as from requiring the people of the several States to sustain it. Lib. 12.82. Compare Channing's proposed modifying of the Constitution so as to release the free States from all action on slavery, and dissolving whoas will be the termination of the American Union, and therefore the South will have more to lose than to gain by it. Dr. Channing, in a sequel to his pamphlet on the Lib. 12.95. Duty of the Free States, was ready to make slavery extension (though h in which James Garrison passed away was marked by two other deaths of much greater consequence. On Sunday, October 2, Channing breathed his last at Lib. 12.159. Bennington, Vt., In the present Walloomsac House. close beside the printing-office
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
rotests. narrows the anti-slavery platform, we reply, that this charge can be sustained only by showing that none are allowed to retain their membership in the Society excepting those who subscribe to the action alluded to. But no such test is required— the Constitution remains unaltered—the platform remains the same as hitherto—as a condition of membership, nothing more is required than an assent to the doctrine, that slaveholding is agents, then what they have done they can undo. Wm. H. Channing wrote to Mr. Garrison from New York on May 12, 1844 (Lib. 14: [83] ): The Confederation was adopted by the People of the United States. And when this bond was found insufficient, the People of the United States' it was who assented to, ratified, and established the Constitution as the Supreme Law. The adoption of the Constitution did not make us a Nation. We as a Nation adopted the Constitution. This is a most important point. The People of the United States, by a Sovereign Right,<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
uel May, Jr., Mr. May—a Unitarian clergyman residing at Leicester, Mass., and universally esteemed and beloved in his own denomination; a cousin of S. J. May, and worthy to be such; a graduate of Harvard College in the class of 1829 with Wm. Henry Channing, J. F. Clarke, and other men of national and world-wide reputation—had now become the General Agent of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society (Lib. 17: 94). This position he filled, with the greatest fidelity and self-abnegation, to the clo his notes of invitation, a Council of Reformers, and the object was to discuss the general principles of Reform, and the best means of promoting it. Let me give you the names of some of those present—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Amos B. Alcott, William Henry Channing, James F. Clarke, William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips, Edmund Quincy, Mrs. M. W. Chapman, Mrs. Follen, James and Lucretia Mott and daughter of Philadelphia, Caleb Stetson, John L. Russell, Francis Jackson, Charles Sumner, Samuel G. H<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
f the Free Soil Party. Review of the Life of Channing. Garrison, as Wendell Phillips reported tohim an opportunity to revise his opinion of Dr. Channing. He read with great interest, and with muche execution of Lib. 18.82. the work, William Henry Channing's Memoir of his uncle, upon its appear self-portraiture: My impressions of Dr. Channing were, that he was Lib. 18.82. somewhat colrom condemnation. In a pioneering sense, Dr. Channing was not a reformer; sympathetically, and th to exclaim, on the floor of Congress, that Dr. Channing was playing second fiddle to Garrison and T to review the incident of his meeting with Dr. Channing at the State House (ante, 2: 96), Mr. Garrison wrote (Lib. 23: 154): When Dr. Channing took me by the hand, it was only an act of ordinary civio face. The truth is, I was no favorite of Dr. Channing, at any time. He never gave me one word ofsibility and sympathy which were lacking in Dr. Channing; and a colleague in the anti-slavery and ot[1 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
as deserving of better acquaintance, and disposed for closer fellowship of Thought and Endeavor, Printed circular. invited to meet at 12 West Street, Boston, on March 20, 1849, to discuss the Advantages of organizing a Club or College for the study and diffusion of the Ideas and Tendencies proper to the Nineteenth Century; and to concert measures, if deemed desirable, for promoting the ends of good fellowship. Emerson's name stood first, followed by those of Garrison, Theodore Parker, W. H. Channing, Alcott, Wendell Phillips, etc. He would have attended the adjourned Anti-Sabbath Convention on April 4, having led the call, but for a grievous Lib. 19.30, 59. domestic affliction in which superstition might easily see the hand of Providence. At the end of March, 1849, he removed his family from Pine Street to 65 Suffolk Street (afterwards Shawmut Avenue), and in the course of this change of abode at a dangerous season the boy, Charles Follen, fell sick and died. A cold brought on
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
l on May 30. The New York Herald's namesake—as vile as Bennett's paper, but feebler—did what it could Lib. 20.96. to harass and abort the meeting, but in vain. The disorderly were now recruited not so much from the Democracy as from the ranks of the Webster Whigs—socially a Lib. 20.93. distinction with some difference. In spite of them Burleigh Lib. 20.89, 90. had his say in splendid fashion; so had Phillips, Garrison, and their colleagues suppressed in New York—Theodore Parker, William H. Channing, and many others. The hostile press surpassed itself in the scurrility of its reports Lib. 20.91, 94. of the proceedings; but, for the moment, free speech was vindicated in the Puritan city, and a new anti-slavery campaign of one hundred conventions initiated. Lib. 20.91. In the midst of the compromise debates in Congress and the growing excitement at the North, President Taylor died, on the 9th of July, 1850. Lib. 20.111. As Capt. Rynders thought it so intolerable and bl
ould receive him, indeed, if not those who had invited him? A prior question was, Who shall inform him truly of the state of affairs in the so-called land of freedom? An American who had known Kossuth at home, and likened him to Washington and Channing Lib. 19.104. combined, told of having often observed Channing's works on his table—excellent aids (we will add) to Kossuth's theological development, but not calculated to make him shun the society or applause of slaveholders. Save him! save Channing's works on his table—excellent aids (we will add) to Kossuth's theological development, but not calculated to make him shun the society or applause of slaveholders. Save him! save him! wrote Henry C. Wright to James Haughton Lib. 21.179. of Dublin. Tell him of American slavery. He is lost —lost to himself and the friends and cause of liberty in all coming time—if he lands on this slavery-cursed shore. here lies Kossuth—the American slaveholder —must be his epitaph if he touches our shore! And again, after reading the address from Broussa: Slave-catchers will do by him as they have done, successfully, by Theobald Mathew—avail themselves of his world-wide fam
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
f a National Compensation Emancipation Society, with Elihu Burritt for its corresponding secretary, Lib. 27: 143, 148; and see for Mr. Garrison's comments on the movement and on the Convention Lib. 27: 58, 163. Burritt was thirty years behind Dr. Channing, who, interested by Lundy's personal advocacy of gradualism in Boston in 1828, wrote on May 14 of that year to Daniel Webster: It seems to me that, before moving in this matter, we ought to say to them [our Southern brethren] distinctly, We c that slavery was a moral evil, and confining their pity to the free blacks. Senator Hayne of South Carolina, in a speech on the Panama question in the spring of 1826, became the mouthpiece of the Slave Power in a way that should have convinced Channing of the futility of his panacea. On the slave question, said the haughty Southerner, my opinion is this: I consider our rights in that species of property as not open even to discussion, either here [in Congress] or elsewhere; and, in respect to