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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 59 5 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 30 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Maria W. Chapman or search for Maria W. Chapman in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 1: no union with non-slaveholders!1861. (search)
little faith of men in public life. A courageous, earnest purpose would settle the question at once, for all time. Garrison's course in the Liberator, and in masterly inactivity, has been statesmanlike. . . . He is wise as a serpent, wrote Mrs. Chapman to J. M. McKim, in Ms. September. With the revocation of Fremont's proclamation, and the approaching session of Congress, the time for more aggressive measures seemed to Garrison to have come, and he drew up the following Memorial to Congresasped my hand warmly, and urged me to call and see him. In Philadelphia there were more social gatherings and delightful days and evenings with the Motts, McKims, and others of that choice circle. Garrison is a real Bishop of souls, wrote Mrs. Chapman to Miller McKim, at this time. And again: I enjoyed the account of your meeting in the Standard. Garrison is bringing up the rear like a good captain. Our dear chief (as Florence Nightingale calls Sidney Herbert) is one to be proud of. He is
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 2: the hour and the man.—1862. (search)
slavery leaders that he and Mr. Phillips should declare the sentiments and demands of the abolitionists in relation to the war, both in public addresses and in personal intercourse with the President and members of his Cabinet, and the Republican leaders in Congress. They felt that if this were done, and the Liberator and Standard kept afloat, other agencies and methods useful in the past might safely be discontinued, and a greater concentration of effort secured. Holding these views, Mrs. Chapman had already withdrawn from the management of the annual Subscription Festival, and J. M. McKim now resigned his position as corresponding secretary of the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society. I retire, the latter wrote, because I believe that my peculiar work, in the position I have occupied, is done. The ultimate object of the Society, it is true, has not yet been attained, neither is its particular mission entirely accomplished. Slavery still exists; and public sentiment respecting it i
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
s and Duc de Chartres, at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Auguste Laugel, the latter a daughter of Mrs. Chapman. In addition to all these occupations, Mr. Garrison was besieged by callers at his lodgings,sul at London (Mr. Morse), and by a number of anti-slavery friends who were happily in London—Mrs. Chapman's daughters and the Rev. William Henry Channing being among these, while Miss Sarah Remond, Bovement in America, and in extolling Lucretia Mott, the Grimkes, Mrs. Foster, Mrs. Child, and Mrs. Chapman, he did not forget to name also the clear-sighted Elizabeth Ante, 1.146. Heyrick of England.oon propose to go up the mountains with you!—I who cannot stand for two minutes. How happy Mrs. Chapman is about her daughter's Maria W. Chapman. Edward Dicey. engagement to Mr. Dicey! It is suchMaria W. Chapman. Edward Dicey. engagement to Mr. Dicey! It is such a happiness to see that old friend of ours happy! I think her, as I always did, the greatest woman I ever heard or read of. She is still the great blessing of my life. I do hope you will mend in
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 9: Journalist at large.—1868-1876. (search)
ght you in contact, besides affording a most instructive example, never more needed than now, of the genuine happiness and true success of a life devoted to a great and unselfish purpose. Assured that you will take our application in good part, and hoping most earnestly that you will see fit to comply with the request it contains, we are, dear Mr. Garrison, most respectfully and affectionately, your friends. The signatures to this letter included the familiar names of Quincy, Sewall, Chapman, Weston, Whittier, Mott, McKim, May, Smith, Weld, Grimke, Grew, and Burleigh, with those of Henry Wilson, Henry Ward Beecher, Mrs. Stowe, James Freeman Clarke, and others. But the labor asked of him seemed scarcely less formidable to Mr. Garrison than the still unwritten history of the anti-slavery movement, and he preferred discussing the topics of the day to recording his life-experiences for posterity. Referring to the ill-health which had in part deterred him from attempting the larg
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
76. foreshadowed. He was deeply interested in the advance proofs of her Autobiography, which Mrs. Chapman sent Maria W. Chapman. him, and as to which she frequently conferred with him during that auMaria W. Chapman. him, and as to which she frequently conferred with him during that autumn. Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. Ambleside, May 30, 1876. Ms. my dear friend: When you kindly sent me the memorial card announcing your precious wife's departure and burial, I asked our dear Mrs. Chapman to thank you on my behalf; and her latest letter brings me your response. With it comes the Memoir—the picture of her beautiful life and death. I wish I could convey to yousympathy and reverent blessing of your old friend, Harriet Martineau. W. L. Garrison to Maria W. Chapman. Roxbury, Jan. 18, 1877. Ms. dear Mrs. Chapman: I have forwarded by the Weymouth ExpreMrs. Chapman: I have forwarded by the Weymouth Express, to-day, H. M.'s Autobiography and your supplemental Harriet Martineau. volume, hoping I have not put you to any inconvenience by not returning them at an earlier date, and proffering you many th
rray should have been inserted. Page 449, note. The Mr. Breckinridge mentioned was the Rev. Robert J. Breckinridge. Page 453, note 1, line 3. For Crowley read Cowley. Page 501, line 1. For Mayor read ex-Mayor. Volume II. Page 35, note 1. Mr. Edward L. Pierce thinks that Mr. Ellis Ames's reminiscence was unjust to Mr. Sumner, and we are inclined to the same opinion. Page 98, note 1. As Mr. Stephen Higginson died in 1834, and never owned a pew in Dr. Channing's church, Mrs. Chapman's memory was clearly at fault. The incident, however, really occurred, as the following letter (which has been placed in our hands since Vol. 2 was published) shows: Boston, May 17, 1836. dear Sir: Mrs. Higginson requests me to say that she will soon want the whole of her pew for some friends and relatives recently come to town. Will you be good enough to accommodate yourself elsewhere as soon as may be convenient?—Yours very truly, Henry Higginson. Henry Chapman, jr., Esqre.