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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 62 6 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 11 1 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 7 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 2 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Maria Weston Chapman or search for Maria Weston Chapman in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 9 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
rs. Lavinia Hilton, Miss Ann Greene Chapman, Miss Anne Warren Weston, Mrs. Maria Weston Chapman. Mrs. Garrison was among those excluded by the mob. She reached Washitill it hung useless from the upper hinge ( Right and Wrong in Boston, by Mrs. M. W. Chapman, 1836, [1] p. 30). Perceiving that it would be impracticable for me, hen he departs. . . . I have seen the Misses Weston, Sisters of Mrs. Maria Weston Chapman; a Weymouth (Mass.) family, daughters of Warren and Anne Bates Weston, of Pilgrim descent. Mrs. Chapman's services to Mr. Garrison were inestimable, her co-operation with him perfect; and on her, more than on any other woman, the condmale A. S. Society, the counsel fee in the Med case (see hereafter). Both Mrs. M. W. Chapman and her husband joined the ranks of the abolitionists against the earnestraits Mr. Thompson's portrait was painted by S. S. Osgood, by order of Mrs. M. W. Chapman. It was sold to Mr. John S. Kimball, who afterwards had it lithographed.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
ust fire off my gun. The subscription of Mr. Chapman's father, towards liquidating our debt, is etc., etc. In the evening I took tea at Mrs. Chapman's; after which, as I sat holding a brisk cohe Commonwealth. That night I tarried at Mr. Chapman's, having first seen bro. Henry and friend m. It was this handshaking that prompted Mrs. Chapman's remark: Righteousness and peace have kiss This may have been the occasion of which Mrs. Chapman speaks (Ms. November, 1882): It was about the number being Miss Martineau, Miss Jeffery, Mr. and Mrs. Chapman, Mr. May, Messrs. Rantoul andMrs. Chapman, Mr. May, Messrs. Rantoul and Hillard, of the Legislature, Robert Rantoul, then a Democrat, and at the beginning of his honoratislavery friends, both male and female, at Mrs. Chapman's, which did not break up till about 11 o'cife, Mrs. Child, Miss Ammidon, the Westons, Miss Chapman, Mr. Sewall, Mr. Southwick, Mr. Knapp, Mr. te period of action. The prospect inspired Mrs. Chapman to address them in her refined verse, full [3 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
tanding, and he had not yet re-examined the matter. I hope he will do so, but really the abolitionists are in such trouble about the clerical defection that I doubt whether he will have time. However, he has given uo the idea of publishing a protest against us. To this, Angelina adds a postscript, asking— What would'st thou think of the Liberator abandoning abolitionism as a primary object, and becoming the vehicle of all these grand principles? The Grimkes had discussed with Mrs. Chapman the idea of a woman's paper, but were averse to separating the sexes into different organizations more than could be avoided, and at present they were not shut out from a hearing in men's papers (Ms. Aug. 27, 1837, S. M. Grimke to H. C. Wright). Is not the time rapidly coming for such a change; say after the contract with the Massachusetts Society is closed with the editor; the first of next year? I trust brother Garrison may be divinely directed. These and other similar conferences
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
you since the one you sent by Mary, but shall expect one to-night, on the arrival of Mrs. Maria W. Chapman. Chapman, or by the next mail. My heart yearns to be with you and the dear babes, for, altall. On Wednesday evening, the public May 16, 1838. were informed that Wm. Lloyd Garrison, Maria W. Chapman of Boston, and Angelina E. Grimke Weld would address the people in that hall. There was anand a Declaration of Sentiments, of which I was chairman. His colleagues were S. J. May, Maria W. Chapman, E. Quincy, William Bassett, Abby Kelley, Peleg Clark, H. C. Wright, and James P. Boyce. I h that derived from periodicals not open to the reproach of irrelevancy. On August 30, 1838, Mrs. Chapman wrote to him: Wendell Phillips told me, after his excursion through Ms. Worcester County, thf the work, and that he could get no assistance in his labors but from Liberator men. Still, Mrs. Chapman and her sisters, whose exertions at this time may be said to have been indispensable to Mr.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
very periodical can stand—the urging, upon every individual, action consistent with his principles and his conscience. These resolutions, together with kindred testimonials in years past by George Thompson, William Goodell, Amasa Walker, Maria W. Chapman, N. P. Rogers, and others, were afterwards embodied in a circular by the financial committee of the Liberator. On February 13, the New York Executive Committee Lib. 9.35. notified the Massachusetts Board that the contract hitherto existias engaged in selling (Lib. 5.156, and Life of Lundy, p. 277). was conspicuous. From New Hampshire came Stephen S. Foster. The business committee consisted of S. J. May, E. Quincy, H. C. Wright, Lib. 9.164. W. L. Garrison, Lucretia Mott, Maria W. Chapman, Lydia Maria Child, Thankful Southwick, and Adin Ballou. A Universalist clergyman, leader at Mendon, Mass., of that wing of the denomination known as Restorationists (the same to which A. St. Clair had belonged); two years later, one of t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
he Constitution, which were all rejected save one, viz., that the Executive Committee should thereafter be elected by the Society instead of by the Board of Managers. The result of this change was, that Lucretia Mott, Lydia Maria Child, and Maria W. Chapman were made members of the Committee for the ensuing year. Among the resolutions adopted, that on political duty proved the most troublesome to frame, and in its final shape was offered by C. C. Burleigh. It read (a large majority approving)ilors. Their condition is a pitiable one. They are awfully oppressed, degraded, and contemned, as a class. If my life be spared, I will lift up my voice mightily in their behalf. Their wrongs shall be redressed. W. L. Garrison to Maria W. Chapman. [At Sea,] June 12, 1840. We have had very favorable winds for the last ten days, and Non-Resistant, August 12, 1840. are now within four hundred miles of Cape Clear. In four days more we hope to be in Liverpool. To-day the Convention
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
omen will form an era in the future history of philanthropic daring. They made a deep if not a wide impression, and have created apostles if as yet they have not multitudes of followers. The experiment was well worth making. It honored America—it will instruct England. If in some matters of high civilization you are behind, in this matter of courageous benevolence how far are you before us! My grateful affections are with them and you. In a like spirit, Harriet Martineau wrote to Mrs. Chapman: Garrison was quite right, I think, to sit in the gallery of Lib. 10.174. the Convention. I conclude you think so. It has done much, I am persuaded. You will live to see a great enlargement of our scope of usefulness, I trust; but, what with the vices of some women and the fears of others, it will be hard work to assert our liberty. I will, however, till I die—and so will you —and so make it easier for some few to follow. . . . The information brought out at the Convention will do<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
tment of the first day of the week as the Christian Sabbath, and to inquire into the origin, nature, and authority of the institutions of the Ministry and the Church, as now existing. Edmund Quincy was made chairman of this conference, and Mrs. M. W. Chapman secretary; and they, together with A. B. Alcott, Mrs. Thankful Southwick, and John A. Collins, were constituted a committee to summon the proposed convention. The call appeared in (among other journals) the Liberator for October 16, with te spectators Lib. 10.194. Weiss's Life of Parker, 1.158. were Dr. Channing, who, as Theodore Parker reports, doubted the propriety of the Convention, since it looks like seeking agitation, and [he] fears the opinion of Garrison, Quincy, and Maria W. Chapman; and R. W. Emerson, who has left the best—indeed, an ideal— summary view of the Convention in its three stages. Emerson's Lectures and Biographical Sketches, ed. 1884, p. 351. Quincy presided. The Come-outers protested against any organiz
3, 274, 275, 301, 314, 515, 516, 518, 521, 2.53, 61, 63, 84, 88, 109, 110, 112, 114; Mary Benson, 2.52, 253, 280; Mrs. Sarah Benson, 2.208, 213; Sarah Benson, 2.229, 238; G. Bradburn, 2.354; J. T. Buckingham, 1.179; W. E. Channing, 1.24, 464; M. W. Chapman, 2.360, 362; J. A. Collins, :418, 427; E. Dole, 1.192, 260, 284, 306; Fanny Lloyd Garrison, 1.49; Helen E. Garrison, 1.429, 433, 448, 473, 2.46, 47, 49, 50, 67, 68, 95, 98, 105, 106, 107, 117, 209, 211, 227, 294, 355, 357, 358, 359, 362, 381,tters from: R. Allen, 2.380; W. H. Ashurst, 2.376, 401; G. W. Benson, 2.38; Henry Benson, 1.317, 320, 322, 2.85; N. B. Borden, 2.311; G. Bourne, 2.238; A. Buffum, 1.290, 319, 322, 326, 327, 429, 430; C. C. Burleigh, 2.51; T. F. Buxton, 1.369; M. W. Chapman, 2.224, 240; D. L. Child, 2.1; J. A. Collins, 2.414; A. L. Cox, 1.433; P. Crandall, 1.315, 316, 322; J. Cropper, 1.444; L. Crowl, 2.315; C. Cushing, 2.330; E. M. Davis, 2.211; S. Fessenden, 1.302; C. Fitch, 2.335; J. Forten, 1.223, 255; Eliza