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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
remonstrates against such stories, as making his hero a hypocrite, the whole book shows an exceedingly high estimate of the friend of his lifetime. Pious words Chase's. Hapgood (page 291, et seq.) records that the pious words with which the emancipation proclamation closes were added at the suggestion of Mr. Secretary Chase.Mr. Secretary Chase. Lamon says that, after Lincoln (page 497) appreciated * * * the violence and extent of the religious prejudices which freedom of discussion front his standpoint would be sure to rouse against him, and the immense and augmenting power of the churches, * * * (page 502) he indulged freely in indefinite expressions about Divine provi Fred. Douglas, Beacher, Fremont, Ben. Wade, Winter Davis and Wendell Phillips, while the most bitter and contemptuous and persistent of all Lincoln's critics were Chase, his Secretary of the Treasury and Chief Justice, and Stanton, known ever since as his great War Secretary. The testimony submitted above seems to show that Lin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
Third Corporal—Benj. R. Cowherd. Fourth Corporal—Jno. L. Shackleford. Privates. Geo. B. Austin, B. R. Alexander, W. S. Broaddus, Harrison Burton, Arthur Burke, Jno. C. Bayne, James D. Brown, Charles Brooks, Chas. L. Bankhead, Washington Bayne, Thos. R. Brown, Jno. E. Baker, Alex. Buners, J. A. Barker, J. Beverley, Jno. J. Cahill, Jno. J. Clark, William Cockrell, F. M. Conner, Isaiah Carter, D. Coode, Butler Corder, T. W. Crow, John Culbreth, Geo. W. Crawford, Hugh H. Chandler, Irvine Chase, M. Cooksey, Charles Daime, Peter M. Daniel, Reuben Dawson, Rodger M. Dunaway, R..A. Dunton, Frederick Eubank, B. Eastham, J. P. Gayle, M. J. Gayle, Thos. B. Gayle, Lewis E. Gooding, J. H. Goddin, Abner Goodall, James J. Gooch, James R. Gresham, John B. Griffith, H. Gaskins, James Haney, Francis L. Hill, Noah Holkman, H. H. Hopkins, R. T. Howard, Isaiah Hunton, Jacob Imboden, Matthew Jennings, C. W. Johnson, M. A. Jones, W. M. Yerby, John C. Rally, Hugh C. Keysear, James P. Kite, Richard
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A noble life. (search)
e the most bitter and contemptuous and persistent of all Lincoln's critics were Chase, his Secretary of the Treasury and Chief Justice, and Stanton, known ever Ziacein McClure's Magazine for 1899 (page 277), calls Sumner, Wade, Winter Davis and Chase malicious foes of Lincoln, on the authority of one of Lincoln's closest intimatReminiscences of Lincoln (page 487). McClure's Lincoln, etc., says (page 9): Chase was the most irritating fly in the Lincoln ointment. Miss Ida Tarbell, in McClure's Magazine for January, 1899, says: But Mr. Chase was never able to realize Mr. Lincoln's greatness. Nicolay and Hay's Abraham Lincoln says (Vol. IX, page 389), about Chase: Even to comparative strangers, he could not write without speaking slightingly of the President. He kept up this habit to the end of Lincoln's life. between the limits of active hostility and benevolent contempt. Yet none rate Chase higher than Nicolay and Hay do for talent, character and patriotism. McClure
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
e the most bitter and contemptuous and persistent of all Lincoln's critics were Chase, his Secretary of the Treasury and Chief Justice, and Stanton, known ever Ziacein McClure's Magazine for 1899 (page 277), calls Sumner, Wade, Winter Davis and Chase malicious foes of Lincoln, on the authority of one of Lincoln's closest intimatReminiscences of Lincoln (page 487). McClure's Lincoln, etc., says (page 9): Chase was the most irritating fly in the Lincoln ointment. Miss Ida Tarbell, in McClure's Magazine for January, 1899, says: But Mr. Chase was never able to realize Mr. Lincoln's greatness. Nicolay and Hay's Abraham Lincoln says (Vol. IX, page 389), about Chase: Even to comparative strangers, he could not write without speaking slightingly of the President. He kept up this habit to the end of Lincoln's life. between the limits of active hostility and benevolent contempt. Yet none rate Chase higher than Nicolay and Hay do for talent, character and patriotism. McClure